The Accelerating Excellence In Translational Science (AXIS)Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science

The Division of Community Engagement produces a weekly, live, 60 minute radio program, ‘Good News Radio Magazine’, co-hosted by Ms. Melanie Rodriguez and Mr. Charles McWells. The major emphasis is on spiritual health and wellness and also features a 20 minute health report segment followed by questions and answers from the listening audience. CDU and community events relevant to the program are also announced during the broadcast.

This program is designed to promote equity in holistic health outcomes and research involvement by (1) teaching stress reduction techniques and coping skills over the radio (2) creating awareness of chronic disease risk reduction and prevention strategies in the community and (3) cultivating trust and interest in Community-Partnered Participatory Research. We invite Community-based Pastors, Spiritual Leaders, Healthcare Professionals, Academic Researchers and Community Members to share valuable, personal, professional, health and research information. Our goal is to engage and enlist the listeners as advocates for equity in holistic health and research involvement in the community.

Good News Radio Magazine is broadcast via Acceleratedradio.net on Wednesdays from 1-2pm.


 Topic : Guest
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Date Synopsis




Shopping for Better Health: Dr. Farid Zarif

Wednesday, September 13, 2017




Childhood Obesity: Dr. Michael Goran

Wednesday, September 06, 2017 Dr. Goran is a professor in the department of Preventative Medicine at USC as well as the Co-director for the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute. He defines childhood obesity as being a child that has a BMI higher than 95%. BMI is weight divided by height. The causes of childhood obesity can be complex and multifaceted. Factors can span from individual factors such as genetics or early life nutrition to environmental factors such as access to healthy foods. Those with childhood obesity have a higher risk for Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, or interference with the development process. If an individual remains obese through their adolescence there is an 18% risk of maintaining a state of obesity through adulthood. Parents play a huge role in modeling healthy lifestyles changes for their children and family as an entire unit. Making small changes such as avoiding processed foods and those high in sugar can help prevent obesity which can ultimately prevent lifelong risks. Dr. Goran is currently working on 3 different studies relating to obesity. For more information on his studies or work you can visit www.Secondhandsugars.com or visit his Twitter handle @MicaelGoran. Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016; Emergency Food Shelter every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am located at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA. For further information contact Lavonne Spicer Moore at 310-630-9530




MELA Counseling Services Center, Inc: Kathy Salazar, Ashly Hernandez

Wednesday, August 30, 2017 This week Kathy Salazar explains MELA, a counseling program for substance abuse in the community. Ms. Salazar founded MELA because she saw a need in the community for such services. The program focuses on substance use recovery through a Christian and abstinence based curriculum. MELA’s clients range in age from 12 years old up to senior adults and approximately 30 clients enrolled at one time. A member of MELA, Ms. Ashly Hernandez spoke about her drug addiction story and how MELA supported her. Ms. Hernandez shares how she began abusing marijuana, alcohol, Adderall, and methamphetamines because of stress that surrounded her life. She was struggling to financially support her son as well as witnessing her father and siblings suffer from drug addiction. Generational addiction is typical, and MELA focuses on trying to stop the cycle. Through the help of MELA she was able to make lifestyle changes and is currently working towards a college degree. Further success stories or more information on MELA can be found on melacounseling.org or by calling 323-721-6855.




Heart Failure and Ventricular Assist Devices: Dr. David Martins, Herbert McElroy, Janet McElroy

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 Dr. Martins discusses heart failure and Ventricular Assist Devices. Heart failure is when the heart is not pumping enough blood that it receives for the benefit of the body. A normal heart pumps out at least 40% of the blood it receives. When the heart is pumping less than 30% it is considered to be a heart that is failing. When both the left and right sides of the heart fail it is called congestive heart failure. The right side of the heart is responsible for pumping blood to the lungs, and the left side pumps blood to the rest of the body. Symptoms of right-side heart failure are swelling of the liver and legs as well as gut congestion. Left-side heart failure causes shortness of breath particularly Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea. Heart failure can occur due to hypertension, heart attacks, obesity, smoking, drug abuse, alcoholism, or diabetes to name a few. It is a common condition that affects racial ethnic minorities at a higher rate because of failure to control risk factors that predispose them to heart failure. Mr. Herbert McElroy discusses his experience with heart failure and the Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) that was implanted in him to help his heart pump. He suffered from obesity, smoking, and drinking which is what he believes led to his symptoms of shortness of breath and dizziness which were signs of his heart failing. His ejection fraction, a measurement of the percentage of blood leaving the heart each time it contracts, reached a low of 12%. After receiving the LVAD he was able to make many lifestyle changes such as exercising, losing weight, and being more active.




Multiple Sclerosis: Dr. Barbara Giesser

Wednesday, August 16, 2017 Dr. Giesser explains Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disorder that affects the central nervous system. Multiple Sclerosis occurs when there is an attack on the nerves that results in myelin and nerve axons being damaged. There are three types of MS with 75-85% of cases being relapse-remitting. This is when a new neurological event occurs that can last a few hours to a few days followed by periods of partial or complete recovery. The second type of MS is secondary progressive which begins as relapse-remitting and after about 15 years can be a gradual progression of the disease. The last type, primary progressive, affects about 10-15% of those with MS. Primary progressive gradually gets worse over time. Symptoms of this MS can range from numbness, tingling, weakness, double vision, muscle spasm, and fatigue. Currently there are 15 FDA approved disease modifying therapies that can help with relapse-remitting MS. There are also lifestyle choices that can improve MS such as weight management, quit smoking, managing Vitamin D level, controlling diabetes, cholesterol, and blood pressure.




(Rebroadcast) Discrimination and Depression: Dr. Miriam Vega

Wednesday, August 09, 2017 Discrimination can cause depression, stigma, and trauma. Discrimination refers to someone being treated differently, usually at a disadvantage. Although the words discrimination and stigma are often used interchangeably, there is a difference-stigma is usually accompanied by blame or discrediting. For example, if a person has lung cancer, people may stigmatize them by implying they “got what they deserved” if they smoked cigarettes. This can cause internalized stigma. Psychological trauma occurs when someone’s psyche is “hit”, similar to the way a person experiences physical trauma if they are hit by a car. All of these can cause a person to become depressed. Left untreated, depression can cause unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, substance abuse, and unhealthy sexual activity. While discrimination, stigma, and psychological trauma can’t always be prevented, depression can be treated through therapy or medication.




CDU Saturday Science Academy: Lorraine Grey, Symone Jackson

Wednesday, August 02, 2017 The Director of the CDU Saturday Science Academy, Lorraine Grey and a long time participant and graduate of the program, Symone Jackson, share information about the Saturday Science Academy. It began in 1990 and is the core of CDU’s pipeline that serves children from pre-k through university level. Seventy percent of its participants are from SPA 6 areas. The program includes 3 eight week sessions which cover Marine Biology, Plant Life, Human Physiology, and Anatomy as well as 1 four week math camp. Parents are also required to contribute 15 hours per year of volunteer service when their children are enrolled. The program not only teaches and strengthens math and science skills, but it instills confidence and motivation in children to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields. Teachers in the academy are undergraduate students from surrounding universities. For more information parents are encouraged to call the Saturday Science Academy office at 323-563-4926.




South Los Angeles Health Projects (SLAHP): Maribel Sanchez

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 This week’s guest speaker Maribel Sanchez is an international board certified lactation consultant and a staff member at SLAHP (South Los Angeles Health Projects). SLAHP is composed of WIC, Healthy Families America, The Immunization Project, and Chose Healthy LA Kids. Its mission is to improve the health of low income adults, infants, and children in South LA. Sanchez further discusses breastfeeding; the benefits for infants and mothers, the challenges, proper storage, and how families and husbands can support breastfeeding mothers. WIC serves mothers and children up to 5 years of age. Those interested in WIC can call to be assessed for income requirements to join. Announcements: Annual Back to School Family Health Fair, August 12, 2017, 130 E. Compton, Compton, CA; Building Bridges Optimum Health Conference: Prevention, Treatment, and Control of Cancer in the Community on August 18th from 8 am- 4pm at Holman United Methodist Church located at 3320 Adams Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90018.




Health, Resilience, & Faith : Dr. Randall Maxey

Wednesday, July 19, 2017 Dr. Maxey begins the program by defining faith and resiliency. Faith is the belief in the revealed truth of God and cannot be intellectualized, while resiliency is strength in that belief even when things get tough. He explains that while he doesn’t believe in “faith-healing”, he does believe that faith heals. He shared the story of a man who was diagnosed with a condition that would require surgery, and could be life-threatening. The man prayed with family and friends, and when he returned to his doctors, they could find no evidence of the condition. While Dr. Maxey does not suggest people rely totally on faith when they are sick, he stated that people who live within God’s will and obey his laws tend to be healthier anyway.




The AMAAD Institute: Carl Highshaw, Noor Singh

Wednesday, July 12, 2017 Founder/CEO of the AMAAD Institute, Carl Highshaw shares why and how he established the institute for the LGBT community. The institute’s acronym stands for Arming Minorities Against Addiction & Disease. Mr. Highshaw and Noor Singh explain how they use a harm-reduction model to help their peers as opposed to a clinical approach. They talk about how each person’s road to recovery is different, not everyone can quit “cold-turkey” and be successful. Mr. Singh explains his role as a Peer Linkage Specialist and what that entails. The AMAAD Institute is located in Watts where both Mr. Highshaw lives and Mr. Singh grew up. They discuss the importance of having a resource center for the LGBT community within their neighborhood. They give an overview of the activities and programs the institute provides to their peers, including yoga, throughout the week and what they hope to be able to provide in the future. For those interested in contacting the AMAAD Institute: www.amaad.org, 323-569-1610, 10221 S. Compton Ave., Ste. 105, Los Angeles, CA, 90002. Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




New Developments in HIV Research: Dr. William King

Wednesday, July 05, 2017 Dr. William King gives an overview about HIV/AIDS. He talks about the current treatments available, including PrEP and PEP, and how greatly treatments have improved since the first diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. Dr. King also shares information regarding research he is currently taking part in on a possible HIV/AIDS treatment called Pro 140. This vaccine is being tested for the purpose of preventing HIV infection. The hope is that this treatment will keep the HIV virus from invading healthy cells and replicating itself. Dr. King explained the specific criteria for those eligible and ineligible to take part in the study. Selected participants will be compensated and be provided with transportation if necessary. For those interested in the study or for more information you can contact Dr. William King at 323-617-5409, 3756 Santa Rosalia Dr. Ste. 506, Los Angeles, CA 90008.




HAAF 25th Anniversary: Dr. Loretta Jones, Felica Jones

Wednesday, June 28, 2017 This week’s episode focused on Healthy African American Families (HAAF), which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. Felica Jones explained that HAAF began in 1992 as a CDC project, Pregnant African American Women in Los Angeles, (PAWLA) to investigate why the rates of preterm pregnancy and low birthweight babies were so high in certain areas of Los Angeles County. When that project ended, PAWLA moved to Charles R. Drew University, and eventually obtained non-profit status as Healthy African American Families. Under the direction of Dr. Loretta Jones, HAAF is considered a leader in Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR), and has many academic partners, including CDU and UCLA. Past and present research includes projects on autism, diabetes, mental health, asthma, as well as preterm pregnancy. HAAF will celebrate its anniversary in October; details will be announced in the fall. Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016. Emergency Food Shelter at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church located at 1511 E. 57th St. Los Angeles CA every 2nd and 4th Saturday at 9:30am.




Hernias: Dr. Bryan Hubbard

Wednesday, June 21, 2017 Dr. Hubbard explained that a hernia is a defect that occurs when tissue moves from one part of the body to another place where it doesn’t belong. There are several types of hernias: ventral, incisional, inguinal, incarcerated/strangulated, and umbilical. Ventral, incisional, inguinal, and incarcerated/strangulated hernias are usually caused by abnormal trauma; however, umbilical hernias occur at birth. Dr. Hubbard stated that hernias are very common in the U.S., but many people do not experience any symptoms and are not diagnosed until they have a physical examination. Others have extreme pain and are diagnosed when they visit an emergency room. Hernias are treated by surgery. Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Charles R. Drew University RN-BSN Program: Dr. Ebere Ume, Karen Jackson, Naila Zoi Cox, Doris Hudson

Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Representatives from the Charles R. Drew University, Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing share information regarding the establishing of the School of Nursing, its mission and vision as well as the programs offered by the school. Programs the School of Nursing offers include an Entry Level Masters Program (ELM), Family Nurse Practitioner Program (FNP), and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN). They also discuss changes recently made to accommodate working students, the high-tech learning tools available, and international programs. Student representatives share their personal experiences starting from enrollment to interactions with professors. The representatives also talk about the importance of serving the underserved communities and having nurses that reflect the diversity of those communities. For more information regarding the CDU Mervyn M. Dymally School of nursing: https://www.cdrewu.edu/Son; 1731 E. 118th St. Los Angeles, CA. 90059; P 323-568-3301




International Health Research Projects at CDU: Dr. Charles Hilliard, Dr. Ekow Sey

Wednesday, June 07, 2017 CDU is dedicated to not only improving the health of the underserved locally, but around the world. Dr. Hilliard and Dr. Sey share about their international research projects that focus on HIV treatment and prevention in Angola, Rwanda, Belize and Jamaica. They discuss the work they do with the military in these countries and why they work with this group specifically. The goal is to extend to the general population through direct partnerships with local health institutions and universities/academic institutions. Dr. Sey and Dr. Hilliard also explain the history behind the spreading of HIV in Angola and Rwanda. Both doctors also share that their current research consists of conducting trainings for military personnel on diagnosis, treatment, care, psychological support, HIV data management, monitoring and evaluation of HIV programs, and peer education.




Precision Medicine: Dr. J. (Quim) Madrenas, Dr. Henry Lin

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 The U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) is a bold research effort to revolutionize how we improve health and treat disease. It was first announced by President Obama in his 2015 State of the Union Address. The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in genomics, emerging methods for managing and analyzing large data sets, while protecting privacy, and health information technology to accelerate biomedical discoveries. The All of Us Research Program is a major piece of the PMI. The plan is to engage one million or more volunteers living in the United States to contribute their health data over 10 years or more to improve health outcomes, fuel the development of new treatments for disease, and catalyze a new era of evidence-based and more precise preventive care and medical treatment. Various methods will be used to ensure that participants in the research represent the geographic, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic diversity of the country. Participants will be asked to provide biomedical specimens and access to their medical records. The program is expected to launch in late 2017 or early 2018, and anyone can participate, although children will not be enrolled initially. Announcements: Building Bridges to Optimum Health presents a “Community Stroke Symposium”, Friday, June 17, 2017, Carson Community Center, 8:00 am-3:00 pm.




Charles R. Drew University Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Dr. Hector Balcazar

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Dr. Carlisle returned with Dean Hector Balcazar to the “Good News Radio Magazine” to provide a quarterly update on Charles R. Drew University (CDU). Dr. Carlisle states that CDU is staying true to its mission “to cultivate diverse health professional leaders who are dedicated to social justice and health equity for underserved populations through outstanding education, research, clinical service, and community engagement.” To begin with, there is a new enrollment management team that visits local high schools to raise awareness of the University among local high schools, and a Memorandum of Understanding has been signed with LUSD and LAUSD West. Dean Balcazar shares which new programs are available in the CDU College of Science and Health and the student services that will be available. In addition, there is now a Psychiatry residency program. The university is working towards a Family Residency program as well. All of CDU’s accreditations are current, and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) has asked Dr. Carlisle to sit on their Accreditation committee. Other highlights include the Spring Gala, which honored Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, Charlene Drew Jarvis, Bebe Drew Price, Sylvia Drew-Ivie, and Dr. Wilbert Jordan. Match Day 2017 was a success, with 2/3 of students matching into primary care specialties, while the remaining students matched into various specialties. Upcoming events are the 2017 CDU Commencement Ceremony, which will be held June 5, 2017 at the StubHub Center, and Jazz at Drew on October 7, 2017. On a sadder note, Dr. Carlisle also spoke of the passing of three CDU icons: Dr. Ernest Smith, Dr. Roland Betts, and Ms. Sharon McCall.




The Top 5 Men’s Health Problems: Dr. Derrick Butler

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 The top 5 men’s health problems are 1) Cardiovascular Disease, 2) Cancer, including Lung, Prostrate, and Colon, 3) Chronic Respiratory Disease or COPD, 4) Stroke, and 5) Diabetes. Generally speaking, men have greater health challenges than women, particularly in minority communities. Dr. Butler explains that this may be due in part to stoicism, i.e. not wanting to be seen as “weak”, so some men ignore pain or other symptoms. Another cause is denial-men tend to avoid going to the doctor. However, in communities of color, health disparities among minority men are more complex. Invalid information, fear of certain exams such as the digital rectal exam, lack of health education, mistrust of the healthcare system, and nutrition contribute to health challenges. Other factors include high rates of smoking, alcohol and substance abuse, and stress. Genetic factors play a role too, but a healthy lifestyle can help avoid some diseases. Dr. Butler suggests not smoking, drinking in moderation, diet, and exercise which can help men lower their risk of health problems.




Creating a Healthy Living Plan: Dr. Valerie Grant, LeBren Marshall

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 Dr. Valerie Grant explains that a Healthy Living Plan promotes healthy living as opposed to treating sickness. Many times there is a disconnect between the physician and patient, which helps to contribute to the health disparities that exist in communities of color. Dr. Grant has identified four reasons that these disparities exist: access, economics, fear, and cultural insensitivity. There is a shortage of hospitals and primary care providers in these communities, limiting access to care. Lack of insurance also limits access, as well as being an economic factor. The high prevalence of diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes in these communities makes many people afraid to go the doctor regularly, often until the disease is in a chronic state. In addition, many doctors are culturally insensitive to their patients, which makes people too uncomfortable to visit the doctor regularly. Ms. LaBren Marshall shares her personal experience regarding having high blood pressure, a bad experience with a provider caused her to decide to treat herself holistically instead of following medical advice. This led her to have a serious medical emergency, through which she met Dr. Grant. Ms. Marshall said Dr. Grant really listened to her and developed a treatment plan based on her lifestyle. Working with her colleagues at Advanced Community Medical Care, Dr. Grant has plans to develop a “Super Group”, bringing together physicians, community, faith-based leaders, family members, and care-coordinators to create an integrated health care system.




Mind Disorders: Dr. April Thames, Anna "Aziza" Lucas-Wright

Wednesday, May 03, 2017 Dr. April Thames and Ms. Aziza Lucas-Wright discuss dementias (neurodegenerative diseases) and Alzheimer’s Disease which is just one of several forms of dementia. The disease is named after Dr. Alois Alzheimer who in 1906 noticed changes in the brain tissue of a woman who had died of an unusual mental illness. Her symptoms included memory loss, language problems, and unpredictable behavior. These are the main symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease. Ms. Lucas-Wright shared her personal experience as a caretaker for her late husband, who was diagnosed with Lewi-Bodi dementia, the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Scientists are not sure what causes Alzheimer’s Disease, but they think it may be related to a certain gene. There are also studies looking at concussions and repeated head injuries, such as those incurred in football and boxing. Approximately 3-5 million people are diagnosed each year, and 14 million people are projected to have Alzheimer’s Disease by 2050, mainly due to people living longer. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s Disease, but medications and social support may help slow its progression. Resources include Alzheimer’s Greater Los Angeles (www.alzgla.org) and the Alzheimer’s Association (http://www.alz.org/).




Teen Sexual Assault: Tiombe Wallace

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 Sexual Assault is unwanted touching of any kind without affirmative consent and ongoing enthusiastic participation. It is reported that 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 6 boys are sexually assaulted; however, not all victims report it. Contrary to what many people think, sexual assault is not always done by strangers-many teens either like, love, or know the person who assaults them. Power and control can be factors for the offenders. Sexting and revenge texts are another form of sexual assault. This can provide an avenue for bullies and predators to continue the sexually assault their victims. Treatment for sexual assault should be trauma informed and victim-led. One method is creative expression, which can include dance, spoken word, painting, etc... Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Discrimination and Depression: Dr. Miriam Vega

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 Discrimination can cause depression, stigma, and trauma. Discrimination refers to someone being treated differently, usually at a disadvantage. Although the words discrimination and stigma are often used interchangeably, there is a difference-stigma is usually accompanied by blame or discrediting. For example, if a person has lung cancer, people may stigmatize them by implying they “got what they deserved” if they smoked cigarettes. This can cause internalized stigma. Psychological trauma occurs when someone’s psyche is “hit”, similar to the way a person experiences physical trauma if they are hit by a car. All of these can cause a person to become depressed. Left untreated, depression can cause unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, substance abuse, and unhealthy sexual activity. While discrimination, stigma, and psychological trauma can’t always be prevented, depression can be treated through therapy or medication.




Syphilis: Lawrence Fernandez

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease by the bacterium Treponema Pallidum. It is transmitted from person to person via direct contact with a syphilitic sore, known as a chancre. Syphilis has 4 stages; the first stage is a sore or chancre; the second stage is flu-like symptoms and/or a rash, the third stage can consist of muscle paralysis, vision problems, and dementia; the fourth stage consists of madness or even death. Even though symptoms may go away, a person with syphilis can still transmit it to others. Most people think syphilis can only be transmitted by sexual contact, however it can also be transmitted by skin to skin contact. Treatment for syphilis consists of one dose of penicillin in the 1st stage and 3 weekly doses in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th stages. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com; Emergency Food Shelter at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church, 1511 E. 57th St. Los Angeles CA every 2nd and 4th Saturday at 9:30am.




(Rebroadcast) Hospice Care and Palliative Medicine: Dr. Sunita Puri, Rev. Maxie James

Wednesday, April 05, 2017 Rev. Maxie James discussed the reluctance of most people to face their impending demise and his approach to getting them to accept the fact that it is time for hospice care and/or palliative medicine. He also talks about dealing with family members who are reluctant to send their loved one into hospice and the reasons for their reluctance, many of which can be valid. Rev. James states that his team, which includes a doctor, a nurse, a social worker, and himself, work together to ease the patient and family members through the transition from hospice care into a peaceful death. Dr. Sunita Puri explained the importance of palliative medicine and hospice care. She described the difference between them and the misconceptions that people sometimes have. Dr. Puri talks about the importance of making end-of-life decisions before it is too late and you are unable to do so. She discussed Advanced Directives and other important documents that can help with this process and what to do with them once they are completed. Both Rev. James and Dr. Puri emphasize that end-of-life decisions should be made well before they are necessary. Family members and doctors should share in these decisions.




(Rebroadcast) E-Cigarettes: Where There’s Smoke, There’s Fire: Dr. Jessica Barrington-Trimis, Daniel Soto

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 This week’s episode focused on the use of e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes are electronic cigarettes that range from small to big devices. Essentially they create an aerosol that contains nicotine and an individual can puff on it to inhale the aerosol and exhale the vapor. The difference between traditional cigarettes and e-cigarettes is the method of how nicotine is heated. Nicotine in tobacco is burned whereas nicotine in e-cigarettes is heated up to convert the liquid into a vapor that can be inhaled. The rate of smoking regular cigarettes has been going down for the past 20-30 years. The prevalence of smoking is 15- 20% among adults in the US. In California the smoking rates are about 11-12% which is the lowest among the states. Adolescent smoking is about 9-10% and has also been decreasing. Many people perceive that e-cigarettes are less dangerous and prefer using it because of the various flavor options as well. E-cigarettes are most common among youth especially high school students. More than 40% of youth who have used e-cigarettes have never tried traditional cigarettes, but are 4-6 times more likely to start using traditional cigarettes in adulthood. There are various cessation tools, but the most effective is going cold turkey. There is counseling and many resources available by calling 1-800-No Butts. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer is available as a resource, for more information call 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com; Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Dr. Victor Chaban

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 This weeks’ episode focused on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a disorder that affects the colon. Dr. Victor Chaban described IBS as a functional disorder, i.e., one that is not caused organically in the body. Researchers are not certain what causes it. Symptoms include visceral pain, diarrhea or constipation, gas, and bloating. IBS is more likely to occur in people under 45, and women are affected more than men. There is no specific diagnostic test to detect IBS, and many people are initially referred to a mental health specialist before they are diagnosed. IBS does not cause colorectal cancer, cannot be prevented, and is not curable. Treatments include lifestyle modification, medication, changes in diet, and exercise. For more information on IBS please visit www.NIDDK.gov. Announcements: Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market, Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Opioid Use Disorder: Bill Tarkanian

Wednesday, March 15, 2017 Bill Tarkanian is the Director of Outpatient and Community Services at the Los Angeles Centers for Drug and Alcohol Abuse (L.A. CADA). He explained that Opioid Use Disorder includes both illicit and prescription drugs. There are three classifications: mild, moderate and severe. The current opioid epidemic is not fueled by heroin as some might think. Instead misuse of prescription drugs is the culprit, and the average person affected is a Caucasian male or female in their 40’s. Opioid Use Disorder usually occurs when a person is prescribed an opioid to deal with pain and their tolerance level increases, causing them to become dependent or addicted. Although opioid withdrawal is not fatal, it can be extremely uncomfortable. However, there are medications available to help cope with withdrawal symptoms and cravings. These medications work best when combined with other treatments such as counseling or group therapy. For more information on L.A. CADA go to www.lacada.com.




Self-Harm: Joyce Lightbody

Wednesday, March 08, 2017 Joyce Lightbody discusses self-harm or self-injury, for which the technical term is “Non-Suicidal Self Injury” (NSSI). NSSI is defined as deliberately injuring body tissue without suicidal intent, although a very small number of people with NSSI eventually consider suicide. The most common form of NSSI is cutting, but other methods include burning or scraping the skin. People with NSSI are usually overwhelmed very easily and have a difficult time dealing with their emotions, cutting or other forms of self-harm are the way they relieve themselves of distressing emotions they can’t handle. The majority of people with NSSI are adolescents and young adults. Some of the warning signs of NSSI are scars, depression, behavior change, and isolation. Culturally or socially accepted practices such as piercing or tattoos are not considered forms of NSSI. The main treatment for NSSI is Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT).




Sugar, Fructose, and Other Drugs: Sweet Poison: Dr. Farid Zarif

Wednesday, March 01, 2017 Dr. Zarif considers sugar a drug. When sugar or sugary foods are consumed, the brain reacts by wanting more, the same way an addict wants more of their drug. He explained that many years ago, sugar was not as prevalent in foods as it is now-it was considered a “treat” and used that way. Today most people have too much sugar in their diet, which can cause health problems. Unfortunately, sugar is in almost every food product we consume, although it may be labeled in the ingredients as sugar-fructose is one common way it is disguised. He stated that sugar is in almost every product in the grocery except the fruit and vegetable section, including the household cleaning aisle! He discussed the effect of the sugar trade on slavery and described how the sugar industry can be compared to the tobacco and alcohol industries in regards to deceptive advertising. He also warned about labels that say “100% Real Juice” and clarified that artificial sweeteners are not a safe substitute. However, the good news is that there are some practical steps that can be taken to overcome sugar addiction.




Eating Disorders: Dr. Diana Ramos

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 Synopsis Dr. Ramos described the three different kinds of eating disorders. The most common is binge eating. Binge eating is when a person overeats until they become obese. Binge eaters make up about 97% of people with an eating disorder. The other two eating disorders, bulimia and anorexia nervosa, are comparatively rare. Bulimia is binge eating and then purging, either by vomiting or using a laxative. Bulimia occurs in approximately 2% of people with an eating disorder. Only 1% of those with an eating disorder have anorexia nervosa. Anorexics think they are overweight or obese and constantly diet until they are extremely underweight. Symptoms of eating disorders can include binge eating, eating too little, not eating, or disappearing immediately after eating. The causes of eating disorders can be genetic, environmental factors, or trauma. Anxiety, depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder may accompany an eating disorder. Treatment options include psychotherapy, support groups, medication, and 12-step programs. The good news is eating disorders can be cured. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer is available as a resource, for more information call 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com




Hospice Care and Palliative Medicine: Dr. Sunita Puri, Rev. Maxie James

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Rev. Maxie James discussed the reluctance of most people to face their impending demise and his approach to getting them to accept the fact that it is time for hospice care and/or palliative medicine. He also talks about dealing with family members who are reluctant to send their loved one into hospice and the reasons for their reluctance, many of which can be valid. Rev. James states that his team, which includes a doctor, a nurse, a social worker, and himself, work together to ease the patient and family members through the transition from hospice care into a peaceful death. Dr. Sunita Puri explained the importance of palliative medicine and hospice care. She described the difference between them and the misconceptions that people sometimes have. Dr. Puri talks about the importance of making end-of-life decisions before it is too late and you are unable to do so. She discussed Advanced Directives and other important documents that can help with this process and what to do with them once they are completed. Both Rev. James and Dr. Puri emphasize that end-of-life decisions should be made well before they are necessary. Family members and doctors should share in these decisions.




Charles R. Drew University Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, February 08, 2017 Dr. Carlisle, the President & CEO of Charles R. Drew University, talked about the barriers to access to higher education for under-resourced populations in the United States, but particularly in South Los Angeles. He uses the analogy of a pipeline. Although students may make it into the pipeline to attend college, not all of them make it out to graduation. Some barriers include student finances, illness in the students’ family, or a change in the economic status of the students’ family that requires the student to obtain a job to help support them. Dr. Carlisle further explains that there are only two institutions of higher learning in the area: Charles R. Drew University and Cal State Dominguez Hills. Options to combat these barriers include increased financial aid, family support, college loan payback programs, and high schools that prepare students for college with advance placement courses and teacher/counselor support. Dr. Carlisle also announced the Presidents Breakfast, February 9, 2017 at the Marina Del Rey Marriott, located at 4100 Admiralty Way in Marina del Rey. The event will begin at 9 am. Other Announcements: Charles R. Drew University, Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing RN-BSN program, for information call admissions office at 323-563-4839 OR apply at www.cdrewu.edu/Apply; Emergency Food Shelter at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church located at 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA every 2nd and 4th Saturday at 9:30am.




B.L.A.C.Mail Productions - Edu-tainment: Spencer Collins, Rodney Chester

Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Mr. Spencer Collins, a founder of B.L.A.C.Mail Productions, shares the story behind the founding of the organization. He also explains that edu-tainment is the process of giving systematic instructions that expands ones knowledge by which activities are designed to create and amuse or pleasure someone; using entertainment to educate people. B.L.A.C.Mail Productions is a community organization that produces plays and films regarding health issues that affect communities of color disproportionately such as AIDS/HIV as well as taboo issues such as child molestation. During most of their events the organization provides a mobile unit that conducts free HIV/AIDS testing on site. Actor Rodney Chester is the founder of the Trio Talent Agency and regularly collaborates with Spencer Collins on projects. Mr. Chester was part of the “Noah’s Ark” cast and talks about the impact of these types of films and plays on the community. Spencer Collins shared that they try to hold their events at community venues as often as possible. Mr. Collins explained that in the future the organization would like to move into leadership, mentorship, and entrepreneurship. Spencer Collins and Rodney Chester announced the upcoming events: Pan-African Film Festival screening of the film “90 Days” on February 12, 2017 at the Rave Theater located at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza; The 5th Annual National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Variety Show, at The Lee Strasberg Theatre located at Fairfax and Santa Monica at 5pm February 19, 2017. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer is available as a resource, for more information call 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com; Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Watts Healthcare Corporation: Dr. Roderick Seamster

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 Dr. Roderick Seamster shares the history and services offered at Watts Healthcare Corporation. Its inception was the result of many years of work following the Watts riots in 1965 when it was realized that poverty and access to health was a big concern in the community. It started in 1967 with a $2.7 million grant that allowed for the Watts Multipurpose Center to open that later included the Watts Health Plan which was designed for the uninsured. Watts Health Care Corporation emerged when it split from the health plans to continue a mission of community based medicine. Today there are 6 clinical sites that serve primarily the adjoining communities of Watts, but also serve those from as far north as the 10 freeway and as far south as San Pedro. The patient population is about 55% African American and 46% Latino with about 33% of those individuals being less than 19 years of age. The WHC provides a multitude of services to its patients that include but are not limited to adult medicine, pediatrics, mental health, urgent care, eye care, dental care, HIV/AIDS prevention, tobacco control, nutrition services, radiology, and physical therapy. For those interested in reaching WHC you can call 323-564-4331 or go online to www.wattshealth.org.




Arthritis: Dr. David Martins, Andrea Jones

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 This week’s episode focused on arthritis which is the inflammation of one or more joints in the body. Living tissue responds to injury with inflammation. According to the CDC 1 in 5 adults will be diagnosed with arthritis. Less than 10% of adults under the age of 40 have it, but it rises to 40% once the age of 60 or above is reached. It also affects women more than it does men possibly due to weight differences and hormones with 1 in 5 males being diagnosed as opposed to 1 in 3 females being diagnosed. There are 2 different types of arthritis: Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common type and is usually due to wear and tear over time. It is generally associated with aging and is localized to just the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis is less common but is the most disabling as it is an autoimmune disease where one’s own antibodies attacks and invades the tissue cells. It can also have systematic manifestations in other parts of the bodies such as the lungs, heart, or eyes; it is not localized to just the joints. With arthritis, the tissue that gets damaged is the cartilage which allows the bones to move without much friction. However, when the cartilage becomes inflamed it causes pain with movement. Usual treatment options are topical medications or pain relief medications such as NSAIDS. Joint injections are another option which are localized steroids that are injected into the joints that are affected. Andrea Jones later joined the show to share her experience living with Osteoarthritis. Announcements: Emergency Food Shelter at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church located at 1511 E. 57th St. Los Angeles CA every 2nd and 4th Saturday at 9:30am




Tooth Decay's Effect on the Body: Dr. Joseph Oliver

Wednesday, January 11, 2017 Dr. Joseph Oliver discusses tooth decay’s effects on the body. Decay, cavities, and caries are one and the same and are caused by bacteria which causes many issues in human health. Plaque is the main element that causes tooth decay. This is a substance that collects on the teeth made up of a mixture of food and saliva. The bacteria not only attacks teeth, but also the supporting structures. An abscess tooth is when bacteria travels from the tooth into the nerves of the tooth which later leads to a buildup of puss, swelling, and more serious issues. The mouth is the gateway to the body as anything we consume begins at the mouth and can enter the body and blood stream which can eventually affect various organs. GERD can lead to tooth decay. GERD is where the contents from the stomach which is filled with harmful bacteria, are regurgitated into the mouth. The key to preventing tooth decay or any oral diseases is to have good hygiene by brushing and flossing twice a day, every day. It is also strongly recommended to visit the dentist twice a year. For those interested in visiting Dr. Joseph Oliver, his office is located at 17625 Crenshaw Blvd. Ste 200, Torrance, CA 90504. He can also be contacted at 310- 327-6060. Announcements: Charles R. Drew University, Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing RN-BSN program, for information call admissions office at 323-563-4839 OR apply at www.cdrewu.edu/Apply




(Rebroadcast) The Importance of Clinical Preventive Services: Peggy Toy, Dr. Kenrik Duru

Wednesday, January 04, 2017 Clinical Preventive Services are very important to receive, especially as we begin to approach our senior years. Receiving these services can keep us active and in good health as we age, adding years to our life. Doctor Kenrik Duru and Ms. Peggy Toy talk about their Healthy Aging Partnerships in Prevention Initiative (HAPPI) which aims to increase the use of clinical preventive services such as cancer screenings, cholesterol screenings, and vaccines. The initiative trains community partners and clinics to work together to increase information and access to these services. The initiative works on making the information community friendly so that they can get the message out and help remove any skepticism held by community members. For those interested in getting more information regarding the HAPPI project they can reach Ms. Peggy Toy directly at 310-794-0658.




(Rebroadcast) Gun Violence: Avis Ridley-Thomas, Debbie Allen

Wednesday, December 28, 2016 Deaths and injuries caused by guns have dominated news headlines in recent months. CDU College of Medicine Dean D. Deborah Prothrow-Stith has called gun violence a "national public health crisis." Gun prevention advocates Avis Ridley-Thomas and Debbie Allen are among the growing number of Americans calling for local and national legislation to reform laws governing the purchase and ownership of guns. As Co-Director of the Institute for Non-Violence in Los Angeles, Ms. Ridley-Thomas notes that while media coverage has focused on mass-shootings and police shootings of Black men, we should be equally concerned about the use of firearms in the commission of domestic violence, accidental shootings, and suicides. Director/choreographer Debbie Allen contends that the proliferation of handgun violence is a reflection of society's "loss of our moral spine."




E-Cigarettes: Where There’s Smoke, There’s Fire: Dr. Jessica Barrington-Trimis, Daniel Soto

Wednesday, December 21, 2016 This week’s episode focused on the use of e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes are electronic cigarettes that range from small to big devices. Essentially they create an aerosol that contains nicotine and an individual can puff on it to inhale the aerosol and exhale the vapor. The difference between traditional cigarettes and e-cigarettes is the method of how nicotine is heated. Nicotine in tobacco is burned whereas nicotine in e-cigarettes is heated up to convert the liquid into a vapor that can be inhaled. The rate of smoking regular cigarettes has been going down for the past 20-30 years. The prevalence of smoking is 15- 20% among adults in the US. In California the smoking rates are about 11-12% which is the lowest among the states. Adolescent smoking is about 9-10% and has also been decreasing. Many people perceive that e-cigarettes are less dangerous and prefer using it because of the various flavor options as well. E-cigarettes are most common among youth especially high school students. More than 40% of youth who have used e-cigarettes have never tried traditional cigarettes, but are 4-6 times more likely to start using traditional cigarettes in adulthood. There are various cessation tools, but the most effective is going cold turkey. There is counseling and many resources available by calling 1-800-No Butts. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer is available as a resource, for more information call 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com; Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Talk About Parenting: Shirlee Smith

Wednesday, December 14, 2016 Shirlee Smith discusses the founding of her nonprofit organization, Talk About Parenting, which was established in 1997. The idea formed when she realized that every child does not have 3 meals a day, have parents that talk to them, or that some parents don’t know how to raise children properly. It began as a TV show and later transitioned into a nonprofit organization that conducted workshops and speaking engagements in all communities. Some topics they focus on are home environment, lifestyle, resources, values, and morals. They also give workshops to incarcerated mothers. The organizations services are available to any person or any organization that is interested. The audience is welcome to contact the organization for resources or more information by calling 626-296-2777, sending an email to talkaboutparenting@gmail.com, or visiting Talkaboutparenting.org. The audience is also welcome to volunteer or donate at any time. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer is available as a resource, for more information call 424-260-6543 or pnwc12@gmail.com; Wellington Square/Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




How to Have a Happy, Healthy Holiday Season: Rev. Paul Hill, Rev. Yvonne Williams Boyd

Wednesday, December 07, 2016 During the holiday season many people tend to magnify their life disappoints, struggles, and difficulties. However, during this time it is especially important to be inspired, to be happy, and joyous as it’s a season of celebration. Often times there is a battle within one’s mind between the sacred and secular during the holidays. The sacred is focused on loving others, care, sharing, and remembering that we have received this gift from Jesus who has come to give us salvation. The secular is focused on pushing for vacations, expensive cars, receiving, and being able to compete with people who have wealth. When we feel unhappiness dawn upon us we need to remember the real reason of Christmas which is to celebrate God’s love and how Christ came to give us life. We need to think of ways to give to others and recognize that God has already blessed us abundantly. Some people are missing the basics of life and it’s a good time to share with them. One should also not have illusions that some struggles in the family units are going to disappear during the holidays. One should stay away from alcohol or drugs as ways to rid oneself of sadness. Instead, there are many resources available that serve as God’s extension of goodness and grace such as counseling, social workers, or health facilities that provide support and services.




The Zika Virus...Not Out of the Woods Yet: Sebastian Ridley-Thomas, Susanne Kluh, and Levy Sun

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 The Zika Virus is a disease that is transmitted between mosquitoes and humans, and can further be transmitted from person to person. Most people do not experience any symptoms at all. However, 20% of the population affected with the Zika Virus experience symptoms such as a rash, fever, and joint pains. Currently, the biggest concern is pregnant women who have been infected as it can cause harm to the fetus and baby. Babies with the Zika Virus can experience severe congenital disease, blindness, loss of hearing, seizures, and abnormal head development. There are 3000 species of mosquitoes that exist; however, the Yellow Fever mosquito and Asian Tiger mosquito are the two of concern for the Zika Virus and are prevalent in California. There are 387 travel related cases in California and of those 20% reside in LA County. The Zika Virus can also be sexually transmitted if ones partner travels and becomes infected with it. The virus can exist for up to 8 months in sperm. There isn’t a treatment for the virus. Prevention is the best method of protection. If a woman is pregnant, it is best to avoid areas that are at higher risk for the Zika Virus. It is also important to go through your yard and get rid of anything that retains water such as saucers under flower pots, trash can lids, or plastic tarps. Together communities can make a difference along with their neighbors if they work together to sanitize their yards. The listening audience is encourage to call 211 for LA County resources in vector control.




Giving Thanks...No Matter What: Rev. Cecil Murray, Rev. Gary Williams

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 This week’s episode focused on the importance of giving thanks regardless of one’s life’s circumstances. In life there will always be positives and negatives, but it is important to always focus on the positives. In every situation it is vital to give thanks to God through the bad times, good times, and even through mistakes. Every day we need to be thankful for the basics such as a bed, shelter, food, and even our breath. God can give us peace regardless of what we are going through. Negative comes from a sense of entitlement. We need to constantly remind ourselves that the world does not owe us anything. We don’t have to have the biggest car, house, salary, or ego. We need to have a sense of gratitude, caring and outreach. When you have a sense of gratitude you will find things come to you unexpectedly. Not being grateful can be destructive. The speakers leave the audience with tips on how to be grateful. First, people need to think more about others than they do about themselves. Secondly, incorporating exercise is important as it enhances the spiritual life. Third, always walk around with a smile. Lastly, they encourage everyone to remember God will sustain everything both in hard times and in good times. The guest speakers end the show with a prayer of thanks.




Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Dr. Randall Maxey

Wednesday, November 09, 2016 Diabetes is a metabolic disease that features high blood sugar due to the body not adequately being able to metabolize the sugar. Organs, vessels and the body also become resistant to insulin. The problem with diabetes is mostly vascular and can come in two forms- Macro vascular and Micro vascular. Macro vascular is when there is a buildup of plaque in the blood vessel walls. Micro vascular affects the kidneys, smaller capillaries, and eyes. When there is high blood sugar, the body turns the sugar into a glycated hemoglobin product that gets into the blood vessels and causes it to get thick and hardened. In order to treat diabetes effectively one needs to have control of their glucose as well as blood pressure. If not controlled, it can affect the kidney or the retina of the eye which can lead to blindness. It can also affect the lower extremities which causes pain, numbness, and cramping which can ultimately lead to amputation. Diabetes can come in the form of Type I which is the absence of insulin in the body; this only affects about 10% of the population. There is also Type II diabetes which is more prevalent and affects about 90%. Type II Diabetes is when insulin cannot be used effectively. It disproportionately affects African Americans and Latinos. Dr. Maxey gives the audience tips on knowing how to detect the onset of diabetes. He suggests looking into family history for the prevalence of diabetes. Also, when glucose is elevated one may have increased thirst, sweating, dizziness, blurry vision, and wounds that take longer to heal. He further recommends a good healthy and well controlled diet that is reasonable in calories, exercise, and movement in order to prevent and treat diabetes. Announcements: Emergency Food Shelter at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church located at 1511 E. 57th St. Los Angeles CA every 2nd and 4th Saturday at 9:30am. For more information call 310- 630- 9530; Southern LA Wellness Center for the prevention and control of Cancer is available as a resource. For more information call 424-260-6543




Lowering the Barriers to PrEP Use: Michelle Simek, Sean Lawrence

Wednesday, November 02, 2016 Michelle Simek and Sean Lawrence discuss HIV/AIDS on this week’s episode. HIV is a virus that causes AIDS. The AIDS epidemic started in the U.S. in 1981. AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. To be diagnosed with AIDS you have to be HIV positive, have a CD 4 count of 200 or less, and have an opportunistic infection. According to the CDC about 56,000 people are affected by HIV in the U.S. every year and about 1.3 million in the U.S. live with HIV. Infection rates have been stable for the past 15 years in the U.S. However, according to the CDC African Americans have the most disproportionate rates of HIV/AIDS. One out of every two gay African American men and one out of every four gay Latino men will be affected by HIV/AIDS in their lifetime. Currently there are preventative measures available before someone is exposed to HIV called PrEP (Pre Exposure Prophylaxis). It works by preventing HIV from getting into the nucleus of a T-cell and further taking over the entire cell. There is also PEP which is comprised of 3 medications that are taken after one has been exposed to HIV. These medications need to be taken within 72 hours of being exposed. Both guests are involved in the HIV Prevention Trials Network Study (HPTN 083) which is looking at an experimental medication called Cabotegravir. The purpose of the study is to see if it works as well as Truvada to prevent HIV. The study will take about 4.5 years and will begin January 2017. The study is looking to recruit all types of people, but especially gay/bi- sexual young African American men under age of 30 or transgender women who have sex with men. There are two study sites available, UCLA CARE Center or UCLA Vine Street Clinic, if anyone is interested in being a participant these study sites can be reached at 310-557-9062 or 323-461-3106. Announcement: PREP and PEP will be available at the OAISIS clinic in 2 weeks, for information call 323-563-5807; Passport to Wellness is a research project on sexual health for black men, for information call 323-451-9491.




Charles R. Drew University Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Sylvia Drew Ivie

Wednesday, October 26, 2016 Dr. Carlisle returns once again to give his quarterly update about Charles R. Drew University (CDU) alongside Sylvia Drew Ivie. The university is not only named after her father, but she is a special advisor to the president in community relations. Both speakers emphasize the uniqueness of CDU as it is a product of the Watts Revolt in 1965 and was founded in response to the issues affecting South Los Angeles. CDU’s focus is to train students in becoming experts in addressing the needs of those who are underserved. Dr. Carlisle explains the university’s target of attaining 2,000 students over the next 5 years through amplifying the pipeline system and increasing the number of undergraduate students. Currently there are 3 new programs that have been added to the university; Masters degree in Biomedical Sciences, Physicians Assistant program, and a BSN to RN nursing program. Dr. Carlisle also gives recognition to recent honored staff, students, and faculty. Dr. Carlisle also shared the many grants and gifts that CDU has received. Lastly, he introduces the 2 new deans at CDU. Dean Margaret Avila stepped down from Board of Trustees to serve as the Dean of School of Nursing and Dean Dr. Jinny Oh specializes in student services. Announcements: Wellington Square Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




(Rebroadcast) Coalition for Responsible Community Development: Tiffany Boyd, Jordan Taiwo Blackwell

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 The Coalition for Responsible Community Development is an organization that serves the South Los Angeles area and its neighboring communities. Tiffany Body and Jordan Blackwell, representatives from the organization, share its origins, mission, goals, and where it stands today. Mr. Blackwell shares his personal experience receiving services provided by the organization and now being one of its employees. He also talks about how he himself, now as Community Ambassador, goes out into the community to recruit adolescents to participate in the organizations various programs. The organization provides services such as housing, education, job preparation, youth development and much more. Announcements: Coalition for Responsible Community Development, 213-743-6193, www.coalitionrcd.org




UCLA-SAFE project: Access to smokefree apartments in Los Angeles: Marlene Gomez

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 The UCLA SAFE project focuses on increasing access to smoke free apartments for residents in Los Angeles living in market rate apartments as well as privately owned housing. The work is being done voluntarily to educate landlords and tenants about the needs for protection against second hand smoking. The program also educates them on how to properly implement non smoking policies and provides resources on how to quit smoking. The target population of the project is 6 council districts that include districts 1, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 14. These districts were chosen due to the high number of apartment buildings and chronic conditions that are prevalent in these communities. The statewide smoking rate is 12% while the smoking rate in the target population is about 18%. In California, over 4,000 people die from second hand smoke exposure. It impacts not only the lungs but various other organs and can result in a multitude of diseases. The project has partnered with various organizations and is also working with 10 Federally Health Qualified clinics to help them improve on their smoking cessation programs. They have also partnered with the American Lung Association to train more counselors to provide smoking cessation classes within the community. For more information and resources the listening audience is encouraged to visit www.smokefreeaptsla.org or call the California smokers hotline at 1-800-662-888.




Parental Discipline or Lack Thereof, Pt. 2: Dr. A. Hasani Perry, Kay Benjamin

Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Dr. Hasani Perry and Kay Benjamin return to do a continuation of last week’s topic on Parental Discipline or Lack Thereof. They discuss the importance in raising children as a village while ensuring that those who also are involved in care taking such as teachers and babysitters know their boundaries and limitations. It is ultimately the parent’s responsibility to discipline, but involving other members can be helpful as well. They also emphasize the importance in helping and supporting other parents. However, the support needs to be provided in a loving and caring way instead of a degrading or shaming manner. When disciplining is done correctly it should leave both parent and child empowered instead of depleted, drained, and low spirited. The important rule in disciplining children is to practice self-care first. It is vital as a parent to identify one’s own strengths and weaknesses, improving communication skills, and learning how to deal with one’s own stress. Once a parent is able to deal with themselves they will better be able to see what their child truly needs or if the parent themselves need to make changes. It is natural to feel overwhelmed at times, but one needs to admit when they need help. The guest speaker’s end with relaying general rules that they believe can make parenting a pleasure as it should be, establishing house rules, exercising time management, and being consistent in methods of discipline. The audience is encouraged to seek extra help and resources from free programs. Kheper Life Enrichment Institute provides parenting resources for more information call 323-750-7550. Free Parental Education can also be provided by contacting Strike the Rock Foundation at 323-298-1085. The audience is also invited to contact Dr. A. Hasani Perry at her direct number 323-291-8048 or by email at Thasani@hotmail.com for more information.




Parental Discipline or Lack Thereof: Dr. A. Hasani Perry, Kay Benjamin

Wednesday, September 28, 2016 This week’s episode focused on parental discipline. To discipline is to teach children how to take care of themselves and how to interact with people around them. The root word of discipline is disciple or rather someone who is being taught or trained. This shouldn’t be confused with punishment. There are 4 basic questions that a parent should ask themselves when disciplining: What do I want my child to learn from this experience? Is what I’m doing teaching that lesson? Are there any negative effects from what I am doing? If so, what should I do differently? Furthermore, the guest speakers emphasize that corporal punishment is never acceptable. If children are too young to understand then hitting is inappropriate and if they are old enough to understand it’s still not appropriate. Dr. Perry shares a story where a father explains, “I don’t hit my kids because slaves get hit and I ain’t raising slaves.” This statement should be used as a reminder when thinking about hitting your own children. The best option is to discuss situations with children and teach them why certain things are wrong. Ultimately, the goal of discipline is to teach children “self-discipline” and to desire, on their own, to be good in this world.




Service Animals: Alicia Rhoden

Wednesday, September 14, 2016 This week’s episode focused on the health benefits of service animals. The concept of service animals began during the period of Queen Elizabeth about 500 years ago due to the fact that she suffered from arthritis. A service animal is an animal that has been trained to do a duty for someone that has medical conditions. Dogs can be trained to alert one of a seizure; they help those with PTSD, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis. There are also emotional support animals for those who have mental illnesses. They provide comfort and reduce anxiety. Service dogs can do a variety of tasks. They can alert people 2-3 hours before someone is about to have a seizure, they are able to bring medication to people, if an ambulance comes they can provide paperwork, they can also help with balance. Service dogs have been known to improve the quality of life and to add years to one’s life.




Yoga: Krishna Kaur, Noor Singh

Wednesday, September 07, 2016 This week’s episode focused on Yoga. Yoga is an art and science that is over 10,000 years old that originated in parts of Africa and India with early roots in Mayan culture. It is an organic approach to life and a way to understand who you are and how to manage all the essences that are within the self. Yoga is a technique of using breath to control the mind and emotions. It unites the mind, body, and spirit. The long term benefits of practicing yoga are creating a stable body system to minimize and even eliminate various diseases. It also improves the nervous system which can decrease stress, and ultimately a person’s organs and health. The speakers emphasize the importance of yoga especially for people of color who suffer disparities in chronic diseases and stress. The listening audience is also invited to a Yoga training program starting October 22nd for 1 weekend a month for 10 months. For more information the audience is asked to call (323) 753-0500 or visit www. Krishnakaur.org. There are also Saturday classes offered at 2146 West Adams, Los Angeles. For more information on these classes you can call: (213) 249-6845




Sexual Harassment and Sex-Based Discrimination: Gary Isidro Veron

Wednesday, August 31, 2016 This week’s episode focused on sexual harassment and Sex based discrimination. He begins by discussing how in 1965 congress passed the higher education act. Since then it’s been re-amended several times. Now it’s what we know as Title 9. It is supposed to give equity for men and women as it pertains to higher education specifically in athletics and extracurricular activities. It further mandates the best practices in dealing with sexual harassment and sex based discrimination. He later discusses sexual harassment cases and how the Department of Education has said that these cases can take no longer than 60 days regardless of when authorities find out. If something happens to a student on campus, the university is able to switch classes or provide escort services as well as mental and health services. Lastly, he discusses how it is imperative to be actively engaged in making all of our workspaces safe for everyone.




(Rebroadcast) Postpartum Depression: Gabrielle Kaufman

Wednesday, August 24, 2016 Guest speaker, Gabrielle Kaufman from the organization Maternal Mental Health Now, explains what postpartum depression is and how it can differ from other types of depression. Ms. Kaufman shares how this disorder can affect women regardless of race, health, and economic status. She also shares that it could be genetic. Ms. Kaufman talks about the different signs both internal and external that can denote that someone maybe suffering from postpartum depression. She explains the various treatment types that are available and can be very helpful in treating this disorder. She emphasizes that it is a very treatable disorder. One of the best ways to help a woman suffering from postpartum depression is to give her support. She addresses the fact that men may also be affected by postpartum depression and should be kept in mind as well. Ms. Kaufman gives the listeners information for resources both locally as well as nationally.




Sickle Cell Awareness: Dr. Carolyn Rowley

Wednesday, August 17, 2016 Sickle Cell Anemia affects millions worldwide. In America 1 in 500 African Americans have sickle cell disease and 1 in 36,000 Americans have it. It is a red blood cell disease which is a group of inherited blood diseases that causes red blood cells to change from a soft round shape to a distorted rigid sickle shape when oxygen is released. Mortality rate for this disease used to be around 18-20 years old, but now people are living up to 40-45 years old. Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder; however, both mother and father need to carry the gene for sickle cell to be present in an offspring. Currently there are no cures except for treatments that can ease pain and increase quality of life. Such treatments are pain medication, Oxygen, and IV fluids. Alternatively, there are new treatments that focus on changing nutrition intake and avoiding sugars, caffeine, and processed foods. The guest speaker later enlightens the audience on World Sickle Cell Day on June 19th as well as Sickle Cell Disease Awareness month in September. She also encourages listeners to join in at the 8th annual Sickle Cell Disease Educational Seminar on September 9th and 10th that will take place at Charles R. Drew University.




I’m HIV-Positive and HIV-Empowered: Edward Collard, Earnestine Walker

Wednesday, August 10, 2016 Guest speakers, Mr. Edward Collard and Ms. Earnestine Walker, share their personal experiences regarding their pre- and post- HIV diagnoses. Mr. Collard and Ms. Walker both talk about how they decided to get tested and the struggles they had with coming to terms with their diagnoses. They also share how their special circumstances have helped them to need minimal treatment. Mr. Collard and Ms. Walker are members of the organization “Strength for the Journey” and discuss the many services, including a week-long camp, provided by the organization that have helped them live better lives in spite of being HIV positive. Both guests advise listeners to get tested regularly and if diagnosed HIV positive, to seek treatment as soon as possible. HIV is not a death sentence.




The Importance of Clinical Preventive Services: Dr. Kenrik Duru, Peggy Toy

Wednesday, August 03, 2016 Clinical Preventive Services are very important to receive, especially as we begin to approach our senior years. Receiving these services can keep us active and in good health as we age, adding years to our life. Doctor Kenrik Duru and Ms. Peggy Toy talk about their Healthy Aging Partnerships in Prevention Initiative (HAPPI) which aims to increase the use of clinical preventive services such as cancer screenings, cholesterol screenings, and vaccines. The initiative trains community partners and clinics to work together to increase information and access to these services. The initiative works on making the information community friendly so that they can get the message out and help remove any skepticism held by community members. For those interested in getting more information regarding the HAPPI project they can reach Ms. Peggy Toy directly at 310-794-0658.




Acid Reflux: Dr. David Martins

Wednesday, July 27, 2016 During this broadcast about gastroesophageal reflux (GER), more commonly known as acid reflux, Dr. David Martins explains what occurs in the body to cause the reflux. He also discussed the causes of, symptoms, complications, and treatments for acid reflux. While spicy foods have been commonly associated with causing acid reflux Dr. Martins explains this is not the case. Dr. Martins also talked about how GER can develop into Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) which can lead to pre-cancerous conditions in the body. He describes other conditions that may mimic GERD, but may actually be other problems. Lifestyle changes can be made to reduce the risk of GER and developing GERD, changes such as exercising, quitting smoking, and diet. Dr. Martins advises those who have symptoms of GER over a prolonged period of time speak to their doctors about it to get checked and treated early before it develops into a more serious condition.




Concerned Black Men of Los Angeles: Mark Anderson, Carl Nicholson, Robert Peters

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 Founded in 2003, the Los Angeles chapter of Concerned Black Men (CBMLA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the social, emotional, academic, and psychological development of African American youth. Participants can take part in a number of programs, including Welcome to Manhood, a group mentoring program for young men ages 11 to 19 years old. While the organization currently serves young males only, plans are to include programming for young women in the near future. The broadcast featured two high school students who were recipients of CBMLA's "Mentee of the Year" award. Carl Nicholson and Robert Peters both expressed the belief that their experience in the CBMLA has empowered them be able to navigate life's challenges with confidence.




Gun Violence: Avis Ridley-Thomas, Debbie Allen

Wednesday, July 13, 2016 Deaths and injuries caused by guns have dominated news headlines in recent months. CDU College of Medicine Dean D. Deborah Prothrow-Stith has called gun violence a "national public health crisis." Gun prevention advocates Avis Ridley-Thomas and Debbie Allen are among the growing number of Americans calling for local and national legislation to reform laws governing the purchase and ownership of guns. As Co-Director of the Institute for Non-Violence in Los Angeles, Ms. Ridley-Thomas notes that while media coverage has focused on mass-shootings and police shootings of Black men, we should be equally concerned about the use of firearms in the commission of domestic violence, accidental shootings, and suicides. Director/choreographer Debbie Allen contends that the proliferation of handgun violence is a reflection of society's "loss of our moral spine."




Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Dr. Curley Bonds, Johnny Smith

Wednesday, July 06, 2016 Dr. Curley Bonds explains what Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is and what can be some of the causes. He discusses prevention, risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options in relation to PTSD. Dr. Bonds also shares that some groups maybe more at risk than others depending on where they live, their race, and gender. Mr. Joseph Smith shares his personal experience living with PTSD. Mr. Smith explains that for many years he believed his symptoms were a normal part of his daily life until he was diagnosed. He shares his difficulty in reaching out to others and going through his treatment, but he continues to go despite his hardship. Dr. Bonds discusses the types of medical professionals that can best help patients with PTSD. He also shares that the Didi Hirsh Mental Health Services is a good resource for those looking for services to help them manage their PTSD. Announcements: Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services 888-807-7250, www.didihirsch.org, suicide prevention crisis line 877-727-4747; For those interested in the Femaales project which looks to reduce HIV, a study collaboration between UCLA and CDU, you can call 323-379-2050




(Rebroadcast) CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith, Dr. Hector Balcazar

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 Dr. David Carlisle, President and CEO of Charles R. Drew University, gives updates on the current activities of the university. He is joined by new deans Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith from the College of Medicine and Dr. Hector Balcazar from the College of Science and Health who share their visions for the university as they move forward in their new positions. Dr. Carlisle discusses the newly re-launched Physician Assistant Master in Science program as well as the new RN-BSN program in the school of nursing. The President also discusses the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the university and LAUSD to help ensure that those students interested in going to CDU will have guaranteed admission if their grades are in compliance. He shares that the university is in the midst of celebrating its 50th anniversary and talks about the various events that have occurred and are ahead to celebrate this milestone, including the return of Jazz at Drew on October 1st. Announcements: CDU Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing 1748 E. 118th St. Los Angeles, CA 90059, www.cdrewu.edu/apply, 323-563-4839, BSNAdministration@cdrewu.edu




Coalition for Responsible Community Development: Tiffany Boyd, Jordan Taiwo Blackwell

Wednesday, June 22, 2016 The Coalition for Responsible Community Development is an organization that serves the South Los Angeles area and its neighboring communities. Tiffany Body and Jordan Blackwell, representatives from the organization, share its origins, mission, goals, and where it stands today. Mr. Blackwell shares his personal experience receiving services provided by the organization and now being one of its employees. He also talks about how he himself, now as Community Ambassador, goes out into the community to recruit adolescents to participate in the organizations various programs. The organization provides services such as housing, education, job preparation, youth development and much more. Announcements: Coalition for Responsible Community Development, 213-743-6193, www.coalitionrcd.org




Cancer Survivors: Pastor Rhonda Santifer, Freddie Muse Jr.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Cancer survivors Pastor Rhonda Santifer and Freddie Muse Jr. share their personal experiences with cancer, how they dealt with the diagnosis, the treatments they went through, recovery, how their faith helped them through, and the changes they have made in their lifestyles. Pastor Rhonda Santifer established the Celebrate Life Cancer Ministry and Freddie Muse Jr. established The Men’s Cancer Network, Inc. Both guests explain why they decided to establish these organizations to help those with cancer, recovering from cancer, or being a caregiver to a cancer patient. They tell the audience that when it comes to dealing with cancer they do not have to go through it alone, they are not alone. They just need to reach out and their respective organizations are ready and willing to help them through it.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith, Dr. Hector Balcazar

Wednesday, June 08, 2016 Dr. David Carlisle, President and CEO of Charles R. Drew University, gives updates on the current activities of the university. He is joined by new deans Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith from the College of Medicine and Dr. Hector Balcazar from the College of Science and Health who share their visions for the university as they move forward in their new positions. Dr. Carlisle discusses the newly re-launched Physician Assistant Master in Science program as well as the new RN-BSN program in the school of nursing. The President also discusses the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the university and LAUSD to help ensure that those students interested in going to CDU will have guaranteed admission if their grades are in compliance. He shares that the university is in the midst of celebrating its 50th anniversary and talks about the various events that have occurred and are ahead to celebrate this milestone, including the return of Jazz at Drew on October 1st. Announcements: CDU Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing 1748 E. 118th St. Los Angeles, CA 90059, www.cdrewu.edu/apply, 323-563-4839, BSNAdministration@cdrewu.edu




CDU School of Nursing - RN BSN Program: Dr. Ebere Ume, Dr. Margaret Avila

Wednesday, June 01, 2016 Dr. Margaret Avila, interim associate dean, and Dr. Ebere Ume, interim assistant dean, from the Charles R. Drew University Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing both talk about the establishing of the school of nursing, background about the school’s namesake, its goals and mission, as well as the facilities and resources available to the students. They explain the various programs the school offers and introduce the new RN-BSN (Registered Nurse – Bachelor of Science) program. Drs. Avila and Ume also discuss the importance of the nursing profession and how the Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing is committed to educating nurses to meet the public’s needs. They also share that the school of nursing has other programs it plans to add in the future. Announcements: CDU Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing 1748 E. 118th St. Los Angeles, CA 90059, www.cdrewu.edu/apply, 323-563-4839, BSNAdministration@cdrewu.edu; Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore.




Postpartum Depression: Gabrielle Kaufman

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 Guest speaker, Gabrielle Kaufman from the organization Maternal Mental Health Now, explains what postpartum depression is and how it can differ from other types of depression. Ms. Kaufman shares how this disorder can affect women regardless of race, health, and economic status. She also shares that it could be genetic. Ms. Kaufman talks about the different signs both internal and external that can denote that someone maybe suffering from postpartum depression. She explains the various treatment types that are available and can be very helpful in treating this disorder. She emphasizes that it is a very treatable disorder. One of the best ways to help a woman suffering from postpartum depression is to give her support. She addresses the fact that men may also be affected by postpartum depression and should be kept in mind as well. Ms. Kaufman gives the listeners information for resources both locally as well as nationally. Announcements: Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, call 424- 260-6543; Maternal Mental Health NOW, 310-289-2202, www.maternalmentalhealthnow.org.




Great Beginnings for Black Babies: Rae Jones

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Rae Jones, Executive Director for the organization Great Beginnings for Black Babies talks about the organization’s history and purpose. She shares information about the many programs the organizations offers and who they are offered to. These services and programs range from healthy moms and babies to fatherhood to job searches and placement. The organization is also involved in media ventures, one of which she talks about during this broadcast, a documentary “UNDER SIEGE! Our Baby Girls are Going to Prison for Profit”. She discusses the many events they organize each year and the various other community organizations they collaborate with in order to provide services and events. Ms. Jones explains about some current pitfalls the organization has been through, but expresses that Great Beginnings for Black Babies will continue to provide the services needed for the African American community as well as other communities. Announcements: Great Beginnings for Black Babies, 301 N. Prairie Ave., Suite 515 Inglewood, CA 90301, 310-677-7995; Wellington Square Farmers Market Sundays 9 am – 1 pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016




Pneumonia: Dr. David Martins

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 Dr. David Martins returns to talk about pneumonia and why people should still be weary of it this day in age. Dr. Martins explains what pneumonia is, how it differs from a cold or flu, and the different types of pneumonia that can develop. He also explains who is at more risk, why, and the risk factors that can expose a person to becoming infected. Dr. Martins discusses the symptoms that can occur in an infected person the ways one can avoid becoming infected, and the various treatments available to cure pneumonia. He emphasizes the importance of taking the medications prescribed for the full amount of time designated, one should not stop taking a medication as soon as they feel better, this could lead to incomplete recovery, and the infection can come back stronger than before. Also highlighted is how smoking is a very big risk factor, not only for pneumonia, but for many other very preventable diseases and illnesses. Dr. Martins gives tips on how to stay healthy and avoid risks for pneumonia; exercise, quit smoking, and do not drink alcohol excessively. Announcements: “Next Steps in Partnered Research to Build Community Wellness” May 25, 2016 8 am – 3:30 pm, Holman United Methodist Church 3320 W. Adams Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90018; “Men’s and Family Health Fair” June 18, 2016 10 am – 5 pm, Watts Healthcare Corporation 10300 Compton Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90002
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Male Breast Cancer: Freddie Muse Jr., Dr. David Martins

Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Dr. David Martins discusses why male breast cancer has lower rates than female breast cancer, however although rates are low the number of men who die of breast cancer is high. Dr. Martins explains the risk factors for men (family history, estrogen levels, age 60-70) and the symptoms men may experience if they develop breast cancer. Also discussed is the breast self-exam taught to women for self-checks should also be practiced by men. Treatments do not differ much from the treatments received by females. Freddie Muse Jr., Founder/President/CEO of The Men's Cancer Network, Inc., shares his experience working with men who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. One of the main issues brought up during the broadcast is the lack of information men have regarding male breast cancer. Mr. Muse also shares the reasons for establishing The Men’s Cancer Network, Inc. and the variety of services and resources they provide. Announcements: “Our voices, Our Lives, Our Air: A Community Conversation on Air Pollution and Health” May 5, 2016 10 am – 1pm, Holman United Methodist Church 3320 W. Adams Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90018; Charles R. Drew University’s Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing RN-Bachelor of Science Nursing degree, Fall 2016 Semester, for information call 323-563-4839 or to apply go to www.cdrewu.edu/apply.
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LGBTQ Health Issues: Jovita Murillo, Giovanna Martinezviagra samples coupon

Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Jovita Murillo and Giovanna Martinez talk about the many health issues that affect the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) population. They explain that the focus on HIV/AIDS detracts from the many other health issues that affect this population, such as mental health disorders, substance abuse, domestic violence, and homelessness. Both ladies share their personal experiences being part of the LGBTQ population including the difficulties they went through and how they coped. They discuss the many ways in which this population needs to start being included in society, especially in the education and healthcare systems in order for them to get proper care and lower the negative health statistics among the LGBTQ community. They express that cultural competency amongst healthcare providers would encourage patients, from among the LGBTQ community and in other communities, to see a provider and receive proper healthcare. Announcements: Community Sexually Transmitted Infections Conference “Did You Know? I Didn’t Know.” October 9, 2015 8:30 am – 4:30 pm, California Science Center 700 Exposition Park Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90037; Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016; Vitamin D study with compensation up to $300 at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709.s">pfizer viagra coupons coupon for prescriptions
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Medication Adherence: Dr. David Martins, Shirley Reid

Wednesday, September 23, 2015 Dr. David Martins explains that medication adherence means taking medications as prescribed by a doctor, taking the proper dosage at the proper times and the number of times as directed by ones doctor. Dr. Martins explains that not taking medications properly can lead to worsening health conditions as well as allow the body to build resistance against medications. Meaning that when not taking proper dosages the viruses in the body can become immune to the medication to treat it so even if the medication is taken properly in the future it will no longer have any effect on the virus. He also talks about the many reasons as to why people are unable to adhere to their medication regimens. He explains that medication adherence is not the sole responsibility of the patient, but that doctors, healthcare workers as well as family and friends should play a role in helping a person stick with their medication regimen. Ms. Shirley Reid shares her personal experience in dealing with medication adherence. She describes how at first she did not take medications as she should and the health issues it caused. Ms. Reid found people in her church that cared and helped make sure she took her mediations as she should. She also befriended her pharmacist who also helps her keep her medications up to date and refilled on time. She advises the audience to enlist people around them that care to help them with medication adherence. Announcements: Community Sexually Transmitted Infections Conference “Did You Know? I Didn’t Know.” October 9, 2015 8:30 am – 4:30 pm, California Science Center 700 Exposition Park Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90037; WLCAC hiring recruitment, September 24, 2015 10 am – 12:30 pm, 958 E. 108th St., Los Angeles, CA 90059; People’s Community Clinic Free Physical, September 28, 2015 1 pm – 5 pm, 400 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015. iscount-on-prescription.aspx" rel="nofollow">click canada drug pharmacy coupon
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People Coordinated Services of Southern California: Joanna Barreras, Tamitra Clark, Charlene Scott

Wednesday, September 16, 2015 People Coordinated Services of Southern California (PCS) representatives discuss the background of this organization which has been serving the Los Angeles community for over 76 years. They share information about the many resources and services the organization provides in the areas of Substance Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment; Senior Services, Youth Services, and Family Services. There are a total of 11 sites in the Los Angeles area through which PCS provides its services. One of the guests, Charlene Scott, is a success story of PCS and shares about her experience going through the program and how she returned to work there. The representatives of PCS also talk about the many events that the organization puts on as well as participates in. They say that the best awards and recognitions they receive are the ones from people who thank them for their services and the success stories. People Coordinated Services of Southern California 1221 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles 323-735-1231, Outpatient Program 323-732-9124, Senior Services 323-294-5226 (South Western Division), 323-735-5799 (West Adams). Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; Community Sexually Transmitted Infections Conference “Did You Know? I Didn’t Know.” October 9, 2015 8:30 am – 4:30 pm, California Science Center 700 Exposition Park Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90037.
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Women’s Libido: Dr. Brandye Wilson-Manigat

Wednesday, September 09, 2015 On this episode, Dr. Brandye Wilson-Manigat explains what the libido is and how a women’s libido can be affected by physical as well as mental health issues. Having illnesses such as diabetes or hypertension can cause a women’s libido to diminish, but stress and relationship status can also affect a women’s sexual desire. Dr. Wilson-Manigat shares that a diminishing libido can occur at any age, affect a women’s overall well-being, however there are a few different ways to treat the occurrence. She discusses how treatments will vary from person to person as every person can have different reasons for their diminishing libido. Dr. Wilson-Manigat talks about the new FDA approved drug, Flibanserin, the first drug designed to boost a woman’s sexual desire. She describes the difference between Flibanserin and Viagra and shares some advice and precautions when taking this drug. Dr. Wilson-Manigat lets the audience know that a healthy sex drive is good for a women’s health and self-confidence, that it should not be considered unimportant or unnecessary. To contact Dr. Brandye Wilson-Manigat, lifelovelibido.com, T.H.E. Clinic 3834 S. Western Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90062, (323) 730-1920. Announcements: Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016; FemAALES project help black women stay HIV negative 323-379-2050, www.Femaales.org.s">free discount prescription card coupon for prescriptions
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Dental and Oral Hygiene: Dr. Omid Farahmand

Wednesday, September 02, 2015 Dentist, Dr. Omid Farahmand, talks about what parts of the body are included when discussing dental and oral hygiene. Dr. Farahmand discusses how bone health is also important in regards to this topic. He shares what the best routine is to keep the mouth and teeth clean and healthy. He also shares how having poor dental and oral hygiene can affect the rest of body, such as the heart and brain as well as how it can lead to oral cancer. Dr. Farahmand lists and discusses the various risk behaviors that can worsen poor hygiene and talks about behaviors that can help with maintaining good hygiene. Dr. Omid Farahmand advises on the best type of oral care products to use from toothpastes to sugarless chewing gums. He instructs on when to start seeing a dentist and how often. To contact Dr. Omid Farahmand’s practice West Hollywood – 310.273.3650, Arcadia - 626.254.1948, http://ofdentalcare.com. Announcements: Vitamin D study with compensation up to $300 at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, call 424- 260-6543.
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CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, August 26, 2015 Dr. Carlisle returns once again to give his quarterly update about Charles R. Drew University (CDU). He shares that CDU has received two recognitions in the last few months, one from the National Medical Association. These recognitions are a testament that the university is on the right track and accomplishing its goals. Dr. Carlisle also shares that the coming year will be filled with celebration events leading up to CDU’s 50th anniversary in August of 2016. He discusses the beginning of the fall semester and current student enrollment as well as the accepting of applications for the physician assistant, master in science program. The physician assistant program’s first class will begin in August of 2016. Dr. Carlisle talked about the physician shortage around the nation and the absence of people of color in the medical education pipeline. He discusses what is being done and what can still be done by communities and the federal government to address the issue. He shares the role that CDU is taking in addressing the issue. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; LA Care Lynwood Center 3180 E. Imperial Highway, Lynwood, CA 90262, 1-888-525-9693, www.lacare.org, LA Care Inglewood Center 3111 W. Century Blvd in Inglewood, CA, 1-888-213-9384 www.lacare.org.s">blog.brunothalmann.com coupon for prescriptions
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Emergency Preparedness: Aizita Magaña

Wednesday, August 19, 2015 Aizita Magaña, from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, talks about the types of disasters one must prepare for as a resident of Los Angeles County. Ms. Magaña explains the importance of having emergency kits in the home and car, having an emergency family plan, as well as knowing the available emergency situation resources in one’s community. Community resources can include churches, community centers, and local civic offices. She stresses the importance of getting to know your neighbors and coming together to create community emergency plans. Ms. Magaña talks about the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience project and the Community Disaster Resilience toolkit available to community organizers who would like to initiate a disaster resiliency plan in their community. For more information on emergency preparedness, Emergency Preparedness and Response Program, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, (213) 637-3600, www.readyla.org www.ready.gov, or dial 211. Announcements: Community Stroke Symposium, August 20, 2015, 8 am – 2 pm, Carson Community Center 801 E. Carson St., Carson, CA 90745; FemAALES project help black women stay HIV negative 323-379-2050, www.Femaales.org.
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Avalon-Carver Community Center: Aziza Lucas-Wright, Jamico Elder, Darnell Bell

Wednesday, August 12, 2015 The representatives from the Avalon-Carver Community Center share information regarding the establishing and history of the community center. They discuss the many programs, resources, and services the center offers to the South Los Angeles community for youth to older adults. The community center conducts research projects as well. It provides thorough background information to the community regarding the process and procedures to help community members better understand the research and trust those conducting it. The representatives also talk about some success stories about the community members who have received the community centers help and how many of those have come back to work with the center. The Avalon-Carver Community Center also holds events throughout the year geared towards informing on health related issues and even provide financial help to its community. The Avalon-Carver Community Center is located at 4920 S. Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90011 and can be contacted at 323-232-4391. Announcements: Community Stroke Symposium, August 20, 2015, 8 am – 2 pm, Carson Community Center 801 E. Carson St., Carson, CA 90745; Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016
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(Rebroadcast) Focusing on Glaucoma: Dr. Richard Baker

Wednesday, August 05, 2015 Ophthalmologist Dr. Richard Baker talks about what glaucoma is. He explains that it is not just one disease, but a couple of different diseases. Glaucoma is either open angle or closed angle of which one differentiating fact is that open angle has no noticeable symptoms until vision loss is severe. Dr. Baker shares about the types of treatments available to slow the progression of vision loss and maintain remaining vision. He talks about the controversy over the use of marijuana as a treatment, the lack of scientific research, and the history behind why that is. Dr. Baker clarifies the difference between the 3 vision specialists, Optician, Optometrist and Ophthalmologist, and when to start seeing a specialist and how often. Dr. Baker also gives advice as to how to make sure one keeps their primary physician aware of any eye care that could affect treatments or medications being taken for other health conditions. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; Family Health & Enrollment Fair, January 31, 2015 from 10am – 3pm at California African American Museum 600 State Dr. Exposition Park; Knowledge Behind The Ribbon Fundraiser Luncheon, January 31, 2015 from 11am – 2pm at Century Community Charter School 901 Maple St. Inglewood 90301
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Older Adults and the Health Implications of Falling: Dr. David Ganz

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 On this broadcast, Dr. David Ganz talks about how big the issue of falling is amongst older adults (aged 65 and older) along with the risk factors that can lead to falling. Risk factors such as having diabetes, medications, bad vision, and a few others. Dr. Ganz discusses how falling can have many negative health implications for older adults, both physical and mental. One of the biggest problems is the loss of independence. Despite these issues many older adults do not talk to their healthcare providers about falling. Even falls not thought of as serious can be detrimental to older adults. He shares some of the best ways to avoid falls and what caregivers can do to help. Dr. Ganz also shares information about the work he does in the area of helping older adults avoid falling. He also provides resources for more information on avoiding falls. Announcements: Vitamin D study with compensation up to $300 at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, call 424- 260-6543.




Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Cervical Cancers: Judith Okoro, Chioma Abaekobe, Ignacio Becerra, Dr. Eva McGhee

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 Students Judith, Chioma and Ignacio, along with their mentor Dr. Eva McGhee explain what the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is, how one can become infected, and the various cancers that are associated with HPV. The students also discuss the treatments available to prevent becoming infected with HPV and how widely available they are for both males and females. They also share that while the vaccines to prevent HPV are easily accessible very few people actually get the treatments due to mis-conceptions or lack of proper information. Each student describes their current research projects regarding HPV and what information they hope to gain from their studies as well as how it can help with the development of better treatments and possible cures. Announcements: Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016; Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 90011, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore.




SHIELDS for Families: Dr. Kathryn Icenhower, Norma Mtume

Wednesday, July 15, 2015 Co-founders of the organization SHIELDS for Families, Dr. Kathryn Icenhower and Ms. Norma Mtume, share the history behind the founding of the organization. They explain that their initial goal was to provide services and resources to mothers with children prenatally exposed to drugs. As the years went by they began to address the other needs they realized their clients had. Today, SHIELDS for Families provides services, resources, and programs in the areas of employment, mental health, family services, substance abuse, and many others. These services are available to all those living in the Los Angeles area. Dr. Icenhower and Ms. Mtume share how some of the programs created by SHIELDS for Families have been used as models for other programs nationwide. Both ladies give accounts of some success stories of their programs participants. The co-founders also describe the most significant award the organization has received over the years and out of the many. To contact SHIELDS for Families one can call 323-242-5000 ext.1209 or online at www.shieldsforfamilies.org.




(Rebroadcast) Compassion: Dr. David Martins, Reverend Russell Thornhill

Wednesday, July 08, 2015 Compassion is the consciousness to other’s misfortunes, life challenges, and life circumstances. It is also described as the capacity for being moved by the suffering of others and wanting to alleviate people from such suffering. The various components to compassion are generosity, hospitality, tolerance, and sensitivity. Many chronic diseases that are stress related could be reduced tremendously with a more compassionate society. By showing compassion and care for others, it can also bring tranquility and peace into your own life. It takes you away from your own life fears and stresses as you become focused trying to help others. The listening audience is reminded to be compassionate by volunteering time, giving, loving, and caring for those around them.




The Passport to Wellness Research Project:  Dr. Nina Harawa, Rev. Paul Hill

Wednesday, July 01, 2015 The Passport to Wellness Research Project is an HIV/AIDS intervention program for Men who Have Sex with Men. This research project is unique in that it includes behavioral, biomedical, and spiritual components in its intervention methods. The goals of the program are to reduce the risk of HIV infection, encourage participants to get tested for HIV for early detection and treatment, medication adherence, as well as peer mentoring. Dr. Nina Harawa talks about the behavioral and biomedical aspects of the intervention and Rev. Paul Hill discusses the spiritual components of the program. They both explain the importance of including all three components in any intervention of this kind. Dr. Harawa also gives some background in regards to the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS problem in the County of Los Angeles. She shares data regarding which populations are most affected in the county.




CDU School of Nursing: Dr. Sheldon Fields

Wednesday, June 24, 2015 Dr. Sheldon Fields is the Dean of the Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing (MMDSON) at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU). His interest in the nursing profession was sparked when, as a young man, he observed that a family member who was a nurse lived a stable lifestyle as a result of her career choice. Dr. Fields discusses the history behind the opening of the MMDSON as well as the nursing programs offered. The MMDSON is named after the late African American political leader, Mervyn M. Dymally, who served in the California State Assembly, the State Senate, and as the 41st Lieutenant Governor. The School of Nursing opened in August 2010. The mission of the School of Nursing is to “advance the art and science of nursing by conducting nursing research and providing nursing students with high quality education and the necessary tools that emphasizes the access to health care, prevention and treatment of underserved communities.”




The Latest News on Sickle Cell Disease: Nita Thompson

Wednesday, June 17, 2015 Ms. Nita Thompson, a sickle cell advocate and educator, gives an overview of what sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait are and the differences between them.  She talks about the importance of bone marrow, stem cell, and cord blood in treating people who suffer from sickle cell.  Ms. Thompson discusses the low number of donors in these areas, the great need for more people of color to donate bone marrow, stem cell, and cord blood, and how to go about registering to be a donor. She explains that there are myths that deter people from becoming donors and she gives facts in regards to the donating process.  Ms. Nita Thompson also announces the dates of World Sickle Cell Day and Sickle Cell Disease Awareness month and shares the many activities and events that will be happening locally and worldwide during these dates.  The local event will occur in Leimert Park June 19th 21st.  Announcements: www.worldsicklecellday.org, for resources and information on Sickle Cell 323-750-1087;  Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016;  FemAALES project help black women stay HIV negative 323-379-2050, www.Femaales.org.
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Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: Dr. Curley Bonds, Clyde Hill

Wednesday, June 10, 2015 Dr. Curley Bonds shares the various types of traumatic events that can cause Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in some people.  He discusses how not only victims, but witnesses of traumatic events can also develop PTSD.  Dr. Bonds further discusses risk factors and resilience factors that can explain why some people are more prone to develop PTSD than others.  He also explains the various treatment options that can help a person manage their disorder and live a comfortable life.  Mr Clyde Hill talks about his personal experience with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder; the events in his life that lead him to develop this disorder , the symptoms he experienced, the personal health issues it has caused, and how it has affected his social  life over the years.  He explains how current media events sometimes trigger his symptoms of PTSD.  Mr. Hill shares the treatment options that have helped him manage his PTSD.  Announcements: Crisis/Suicide Prevention Hotline 877-727-4747;  Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services, www.didihirsch.org, 310-751-5441;  Vitamin D study with compensation up to $300 at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709;  Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, call 424- 260-6543.
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L.A. Centers for Alcohol and Drug Abuse: Bill Tarkanian, Liana Sanchez

Wednesday, June 03, 2015 Representatives from the Los Angeles Centers for Alcohol and Drug Abuse (L.A. CADA) agency, Bill Tarkanian and Liana Sanchez share background information about the agency’s start and founders. They also talk about the many services provided by L.A. CADA for adults and youth; services include both outpatient and residential programs. They explained that these services and resources are available not only by being court-mandated, but to the public at large. Also, both Mr. Tarkanian and Ms. Sanchez share their personal stories about their past history with substance abuse, how they overcame their addictions, and how they became L.A. CADA staff. They informed the audience that the agency has two main offices, one located in Santa Fe Springs and the second located in Downtown L.A. in the Skid Row area, as well as having many other satellite offices. Announcements: FemAALES project, help black women stay HIV negative 323-379-2050, www.Femaales.org; Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 90011, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; L.A. Centers for Alcohol and Drug Abuse, www.lacada.com, Santa Fe Springs Office 562-906-2676, Downtown/Skid Row Office 213-626-6411.




Lupus: Luz Hernandez, Tiera Grant

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 National Health Educator Luz Hernandez, from the Lupus Foundation of America, shares information about the autoimmune disease known as lupus. She informs the audience that it is a very complex disease that can occur in various parts of the body, is very hard to identify, and can take years to be diagnosed. Ms. Hernandez also shares that 90% of people diagnosed with lupus are women and women of color are at higher risk of developing lupus. She talks about the various treatments and lack of a cure. Ms. Tiera Grant shares her personal experience in coping with having lupus. She talks about being diagnosed with lupus at an early age, living with the disease for the past 12 years, and how she has overcome some of the perceived limitations imposed by lupus. Ms. Grant shares some words of encouragement for those who may be living with lupus. Luz Hernandez also shares information about the Lupus Foundation of America; its resources, services, and campaigns. Announcements: Lupus Foundation of America, 1800 Studebaker Road, Suite 700 Cerritos, California 90703, www.lupus.org, 800-558-0121; Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016; Alcoholism Center for Women/CDU Farmers Market, Wednesdays 11am – 5pm, 1147 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles, CA 90006.




Food Allergies: Dr. Farid Zarif

Wednesday, May 20, 2015 On this broadcast returning nutritionist Dr. Farid Zarif explains what happens in the body when one is having an allergic reaction and what causes allergic reactions to foods. He talks about the different types of allergies and the most common foods that produce them. Dr. Zarif also discusses that allergies can be developed as well as be genetically transmitted. He advises on the best types of foods to eat to lower the risk of developing allergies and clarifies information that lead to the myths about causes of allergic reactions. Dr. Farid Zarif shares some information about his new book, “Slaves of the Tongue” which informs about the science of food and lowering the risks of illness and disease. Announcements: Vitamin D study with compensation up to $300 at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation Wellness Center for the prevention and control of cancer, call 424- 260-6543.




Sleep Apnea: Dr. David Martins, Dwight Ross

Wednesday, May 13, 2015 Dr. David Martins explains what is meant when someone is said to have a sleep apnea and talks about 3 different types of apneas. He discusses the differences in the causes of each type and how sleep apneas are diagnosed. Dr. Martins gives advice as to how to lessen sleep apnea episodes oneself and talks about the many different treatment methods available to eliminate this sleeping disorder. Mr. Dwight Ross, who suffered from a sleep apnea, shares his personal experience in dealing with this sleeping disorder. He explains how his sleep apnea was affecting his overall health and quality of life as well as what led to his being diagnosed and what treatment has worked for him. Mr. Ross shares how his quality of life has improved. Announcements: Brown Bag Lunch Symposium “Environmental Justice – It is our Business”, May 15, 2015 10am – 12pm, Avalon-Carver Community Center 4920 S. Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90011; Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore.




Watts/Century Latino Organization: Arturo Ybarra, Pahola Ybarra

Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Arturo Ybarra, the director, and Pahola Ybarra, the program coordinator, share the background about the establishing of the Watts/Century Latino Organization (WCLO) and the services and programs the organization provides to the Watts Community. Both guest noted that although “Latino” is in the name of the organization, they serve all ethnicities, races, and cultures in the Watts area. One of the main programs of the organization is the South Los Angeles Home Ownership program which provides First-Time Home Buyer Education and Counseling as well as Foreclosure Prevention and Counseling. The organization also conducts English as a Second Language (ESL) classes and has a computer lab that is open to the community for doing homework or conducting job searches. The WCLO has two main annual events, the Cinco de Mayo multi-cultural celebration and the Christmas Food Basket giveaway. For those interested in reaching out to the WCLO you can call 323-564-9140, send an email to aybarra@wacelo.org or visit the main office located at 10360 Wilmington Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90002. Announcements: Brown Bag Lunch Symposium “Environmental Justice – It is our Business”, May 15, 2015 10am – 12pm, Avalon-Carver Community Center 4920 S. Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90011, FemAALES project help black women stay HIV negative 323-379-2050, www.Femaales.org, Watts/Century Latino Organization Annual Cinco de Mayo multi-cultural celebration, May 16, 2015, 10am – 4pm, Watts Towers 1761-1765 East 107th Street, Los Angeles, California.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Dr. Steve Michael

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Dr. Carlisle returns once again to give his quarterly update about Charles R. Drew University (CDU). He begins with the sad announcement of the passing of Dr. Gus Gill on April 7, 2015. Dr. Gill served CDU for 37 years as an Otolaryngologist and for a time as Senior advisor to the president. He retired from CDU on April 1, 2015. A memorial service for Dr. Gus Gill will be held on May 2, 2015 at CDU. Dr. Carlisle introduced the new Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost of CDU Dr. Steve Michael. Dr. Michael shared what he hopes to bring to the university and plans to accomplish. Dr. Carlisle also shared that Match Day for students went very well, with 72% of CDU students being matched to residency’s for primary care. Also discussed were the upcoming 31st annual commencement ceremony, CDU 50th anniversary celebration and CDU students Global Mission project. Announcements: Dr. Gus Gill Memorial, May 2, 2015, 11:00am, 1748 E. 118th St., Los Angeles, CA 90059; “HIV/AIDS and the Black Community” Congress Members Maxine Waters and Robin Kelly will be in attendance, May 2, 2015 2pm – 4pm, 1731 E. 120th St., Los Angeles, CA 90059.




Los Angeles Urban League: D'Ann Morris

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 D’Ann Morris, Director of Health Initiatives for the Los Angeles Urban League (LAUL), shares some background about the establishing of the LAUL and how services and programs have been added and expanded over the years. The LAUL sponsors programs for health issues like cancer and flu shots, medication awareness and adherence, grocery shopping and reading labels, school tutoring and mentoring, as well as job placement and small business help just to name a few. All programs are free and available to all age groups. Some of these programs even provide gift cards to grocery stores or pharmacies. Ms. Morris also explains the research study that the LAUL is involved in called the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative, in which trained volunteers go door to door to assess and treat the health issues and needs of households in a 70-block area in Los Angeles. The purpose of the study is to help create appropriate models of health interventions and the access to them. For those interested in reaching out the LAUL you can call 323-299-9660, or go online to www.laul.org/, or visit the main office located at 3450 Mount Vernon Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90008. Announcements: Wellington Square/CDU Farmers Market, Sundays 9am – 1pm, 4394 W. Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016; Alcoholism Center for Women/CDU Farmers Market, Wednesdays 11am – 5pm, 1147 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles, CA 90006.




STDs in Youth and Seniors: Dr. Wilbert Jordan, Donnie Frazier, Percival Pandy

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 The guests talk about how prevalent sexually transmitted diseases are and which are the most common; syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. They share which groups are growing in numbers of infections and why that is. They also explain how if left untreated some of these diseases can lead to blindness or sterility. The guests inform on how to lower the risk of becoming infected. They also discuss some of the effective methods to address and create awareness on the issue of sexually transmitted diseases and the importance of implementing these methods in different venues such as churches and especially schools. Dr. Wilbert Jordan, Donnie Frazier, and Percival Pandy share some resources available to get more information or help: teensource.org, iwannaknow.org, www.cdc.gov/std. Announcements: Brown Bag Lunch Symposium “Autism in Our Community, It’s Ok to Talk About It”, April 17, 2015 10am – 12pm, Avalon-Carver Community Center 4920 S. Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90011.




Sexual Assault: Tiombe Sewell

Wednesday, April 08, 2015 Guest Tiombe Sewell explains what is labeled as sexual assault and the implications of being a victim. The discussion includes reasons as to why victims do not report being assaulted, why families can have a hard time accepting a loved one has been a victim, and how to report being assaulted. Ms. Sewell talks about the profile of an attacker and what their motives for assaulting a victim are. She also discusses the steps and rights of a victim during the reporting process. Resources for victims and their families can be received from the National Sexual Assault Hotline, 1-800-656-4673 as well as from LA County District Attorney’s Victim-Witness Assistance Program, 1-800-380-3811. Announcements: Brown Bag Lunch Symposium “Autism in Our Community, It’s Ok to Talk About It”, April 17, 2015 10am – 12pm, Avalon-Carver Community Center 4920 S. Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90011.




PrEPing for PrEP: Minister Donta Morrison, Terry Smith

Wednesday, April 01, 2015 African Americans continue to be disproportionately represented among new cases of HIV infections in the United States. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one recent development that is being promoted within some sectors of the scientific community as a means of reducing infections, especially within hard-to-reach populations such as gay or bisexual Black men. While there has been dissention about the appropriateness of using PrEP within some quarters of the Black community, a growing number of studies are showing that this biomedical option may be an effective and important new addition to the “HIV prevention toolbox.” AIDS Project Los Angeles will host a PrEP Community Town Hall meeting on Tuesday, April 7 beginning at 7pm.




Social Workers : Dr. Shirley Better, David P. Lee, Jennifer Viveros

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 The guests speak about their experiences being social workers. They explain what a social worker does, what characteristics make a good social worker, and how they can help people cope with life problems by directing them to resources or through counseling. The social workers talk about the difficulties they can encounter at times in regards to being able to provide needed services as well as the lack of people seeking them out voluntarily due to misinformation about what social workers actually do. They describe the various areas in which social workers can be found such as in HIV services, marriage and family health services, mental health services, juvenile delinquency services, and many more. The speakers also advise listeners on how to go about reporting a social worker who does not behave appropriately or does not provide the requested services (Board of Behavioral Sciences, www.bbs.ca.gov). The guest speakers encourage people to seek out social workers when they need help in life. Social workers can be sought out without a referral, they can be found through www.211.org or calling 2-1-1, community centers, and churches.




You Can...Because you are Strong, Loving, and Capable! : Dr. A. Hasani Perry

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Dr. A. Hasani Perry shares her experience growing up in St. Louis and then moving to L.A, how growing up she lived in a neighborhood, but today a neighborhood has a different meaning, neighbors do not look out for each other like they used to. Dr. Perry talks about her belief that everyone has a purpose and that the road to fulfill that purpose may not be easy. She also explains that people need to find out about their history and roots so they know where they come from, what they are made of, and know what their ancestors have accomplished before them, in turn making them just as able to succeed. With this knowledge comes strength and confidence. Dr. Perry shares her message that “You Can…Because You Are Strong, Loving, and Capable!” and to change your way of thinking in order to change your outcomes in life. Announcement: Coming Forth by Day book signing and discussion, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 6pm – 8pm KRST Unity Center of African Spiritual Science, 7825 S. Western Ave Los Angeles, CA 90047.




Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) : Timothy Watkins Sr.

Wednesday, March 11, 2015 Mr. Timothy Watkins Sr. tells about the history, founder and founding of the Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC). He shares the involvement of the WLCAC with the Watts area and what services, resources and events it provides for free to the community. Services are provided for youth, seniors, homeless, formerly incarcerated and many other members of the community. Services include housing, after school programs, job placement and many others. Events include health fairs and quarterly BBQs. Mr. Watkins also shares the many future endeavors the WLCAC will embark on including an urban farm in Watts and participating in a PBS documentary on the past 50 years of Los Angeles with a feature on Watts. For those interested in reaching out to the WLCAC you can call 323-563-5639, or go online to www.wlcac.org or visit the main office located at 10950 S. Central Ave., Watts, CA 90059.




AIDS and Communities of Color: What’s Next? : Reverend Damali “Najuma” Smith-Pollard, Hilda, Victoria

Wednesday, March 04, 2015 This broadcast highlights the observances of the National Week of Prayer for the Healing of HIV/AIDS and National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (3/10). Reverend Najuma Pollard-Smith talks about how churches in many communities have responded to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and how they continue to grow in acceptance and outreach to communities. She gives her opinion on how churches will become even more open to providing resources and services in regards to HIV/AIDS in the future. Victoria and Hilda share their personal experiences regarding how they came to be infected and how the LODi project has helped them through support services. The LODi (Ladies of Diversity) project focus was to link HIV positive women of color with care and support services and to help them retain these services. This project was based in Los Angeles. Announcements: LODi project, 213-484-1186 x3016 www.ladiesofdiversity.com; The LIFE Center (CDU & Black Women for Wellness partnership) Grand Opening, March 7, 2015 11am-4pm, 9900 S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90044, www.bwwla.org, 323-290-5955.




How Compassion Affects the Health of the Community: Dr. David Martins, Rev. Kelvin Sauls

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 Dr. Martins and Reverend Kelvin Sauls describe what compassion is and discuss how showing compassion or a lack of compassion can affect a person’s health. They discuss how compassion should come from society at large; public servants, medical providers, neighbors, as well as those close to us. The added stressors that different people around us can cause can be very detrimental to our physical and mental health. Both guests explain how we must also learn to have compassion for ourselves and not be too hard on ourselves when mistakes are made or we are feeling less than adequate. Dr. Martins gives an overview on the results of a study he conducted on compassion and how they help to understand people’s thoughts on what compassion is and how they rate themselves when it comes to compassion. Both guests also advise as to how to cope when we are not shown compassion and keep it from affecting our health.




Black History Month, Health Disparities: What has Changed and What hasn't?

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 On this week’s broadcast, Dr. David Martins and Aziza Lucas-Wright discuss the major causes of health disparities in the African American community. Dr. Martins explains that it’s not just about looking at the numbers in the data, but at environments and society itself. Both Dr. Martins and Aziza bring to light how the medical community needs to shed biases in order for all people to receive the proper and appropriate care. They also comment on how this change can lead to the lowering of health disparity among the African American community as well as in other underserved communities. Dr. Martins and Aziza also talk about how important it is for people to take their health care into their own hands and make sure they get the care they deserve from their medical providers. Announcements: “Black Love is Still Safe Love”, interventions to prevent HIV from experts in the field, Friday February 20, 2015, 5m – 8pm, Bayou Grille, 1400 N. La Brea, Inglewood, Brown Bag Lunch Symposium; A Matter of the Heart” February 20, 2015, 10am to 12pm, Avalon Carver Community Center, 4920 S. Avalon Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90011; Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; CDU farmers market every Sunday from 10 am- 2 pm at Vermont Village; Femaales project looks to reduce HIV in African American women, you can call 323-379-2050 or www.femaales.org; Vitamin D study at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; call 424- 260-6543 for the Southern Los Angeles and Patient Navigation Wellness Center




Eating Disorders: Dr. Diana Ramos, Keesha Broome

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 Dr. Diana Ramos and Mrs. Keesha Broome share information regarding causes and consequences of eating disorders as well as who can be at risk for developing the disorder. They talk about the various types of disorders and possible treatments for them, however they emphasize that the disorders and treatments vary from person to person. Mrs. Broome shares her personal experience with an eating disorder and how she was able to overcome it. Dr. Ramos gives information on resources available through the county and Mrs. Keesha Broome gives contact information for Monte Nido Eating Disorder Treatment Center. Announcements: “Black Love is Still Safe Love”, interventions to prevent HIV from experts in the field, Friday February 20, 2015, 5m – 8pm, Bayou Grille, 1400 N. La Brea, Inglewood.




Organ and Tissue Donation: Charlene Zettel, Terri Long, Mindy and Jesus Cruz

Wednesday, February 04, 2015 CEO of Donate Life California, Charlene Zettel, talks about why it is important to maintain an organ and tissue donor registry and the various ways in which people can register to donate. She explains that there are over 22,000 people in California alone who are waiting for transplants. Ms. Zettel also gives details about who can register, the various organs and tissues that can be donated, and quality of life for recipients and living donors. Terri Long shares her experience in regards to being a liver transplant recipient. She talks about her feelings in dealing with the notion that a family lost a loved one and she was the recipient of the donated organ. Mindy and Jesus Cruz share their story as parents of a donor. Their son Jesus “Jesse” Cruz collapsed one day and was not able to be saved, Jesse had registered to donate a few years before and was a candidate to be a tissue donor. Mindy and Jesus Cruz describe how their family talked about being donors and honoring those decisions for each other. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; CDU farmers market every Sunday from 10 am- 2 pm at Vermont Village; Femaales project looks to reduce HIV in African American women, you can call 323-379-2050 or www.femaales.org; Vitamin D study at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; call 424- 260-6543 for the Southern Los Angeles and Patient Navigation Wellness Center, this center focus is to help reduce the burden of cancer in the community.




Focusing on Glaucoma: Dr. Richard Baker

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 Ophthalmologist Dr. Richard Baker talks about what glaucoma is. He explains that it is not just one disease, but a couple of different diseases. Glaucoma is either open angle or closed angle of which one differentiating fact is that open angle has no noticeable symptoms until vision loss is severe. Dr. Baker shares about the types of treatments available to slow the progression of vision loss and maintain remaining vision. He talks about the controversy over the use of marijuana as a treatment, the lack of scientific research, and the history behind why that is. Dr. Baker clarifies the difference between the 3 vision specialists, Optician, Optometrist and Ophthalmologist, and when to start seeing a specialist and how often. Dr. Baker also gives advice as to how to make sure one keeps their primary physician aware of any eye care that could affect treatments or medications being taken for other health conditions. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; Family Health & Enrollment Fair, January 31, 2015 from 10am – 3pm at California African American Museum 600 State Dr. Exposition Park; Knowledge Behind The Ribbon Fundraiser Luncheon, January 31, 2015 from 11am – 2pm at Century Community Charter School 901 Maple St. Inglewood 90301




(Rebroadcast) Physician Assistants: Katayoun Moini

Wednesday, January 21, 2015 Professor Katayoun Moini, Director of the CDU Physician Assistant (PA) program, explains what a physician assistant is trained to do and where you would encounter one. She also shares how getting treated by a physician assistant compares to being seen by a medical doctor in all areas including quality of service and cost. Usually a person who gets medical treatment is seen by a physician assistant without knowing it. Professor Moini clarifies that a physician assistant is a very well trained medical expert who can provide the necessary medical assistance. She announces that the CDU physician assistant program will be starting in August of 2015 and what qualifications are required of any candidate interested in applying for the CDU program or any other PA program.




The Thyroid and Your Overall Health: Dr. David Martins, Loretta Jones

Wednesday, January 14, 2015 Dr. David Martins gives background on what the thyroid is and what its function is in the body. He explains the differences between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism along with their symptoms, diagnosis procedures, and how each can affect ones’ health. Loretta Jones shares her personal experience dealing with both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism and gives advice to listeners on how to make sure a doctor is thoroughly aware of ones symptoms in order to be properly diagnosed. Both Dr. Martins and Ms. Loretta cover treatment options and their lasting effects. They also encourage those who know someone who claim, show signs or symptoms of thyroid disorder to be more compassionate and understanding of that person and not stigmatize them in regards to their health issues. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore; Holy Hook Up “The Finale” Featuring The Sons of Thunder, January 23, 2015 at 6:30pm, Holman United Methodist Church 3320 Adams Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90018.




Caring for the Caregivers: Constance Kizzie-Gillett, Assata Umoja

Wednesday, January 07, 2015 Caregivers Constance and Assata share their personal experiences in becoming and being caregivers. They talk about the stresses, challenges, and struggles when it comes to caregiving. They also talk about available resources for caregivers and how important it is for caregivers to be proactive in finding out and taking advantage of them as much as possible. Both ladies discuss how essential it is to not forget to take care of one-self emotionally and physically as well and for others to support and help a caregiver however and whenever they can. They explain that caregivers may feel guilty at first about taking time for themselves, however that they should not. If a caregiver takes care of themselves then they are better able to care for their loved one. The guests suggest that caregivers make sure they have hobbies, plans, and goals outside of being a caregiver that can be looked to once the loved one cared for passes away. Constance Gillett is the founder of Lillie’s Care Circle, a support group for caregivers. Announcements: AARP www.aarp.org/caregiving; LA Department of Aging (Multi-service Senior Program), California Department of Aging; Lillie’s Care Circle (CARES) 5730 S. Crenshaw Blvd., Sundays at 1 PM; In Home Health Care 888-944-IHSS, 213-744-4477, www.dpss.lacounty.gov/dpss/ihss,; Village Health Center 4071 W. Pico Blvd., Support Group every 4th Saturday at 5 PM, Contact Denise Davidson




(Rebroadcast) Cutting Slack Instead of Cutting Throat: Reverend Cecil Murray

Wednesday, December 31, 2014 This week’s episode focused on the importance of being kind to one another. Many people experience hurt between each other. Usually these feelings are exacerbated when we already feel hurt within ourselves. As a community everyone needs to learn how to cut some slack for others. Among young black males ages 18-31, the leading cause of death is homicide. The second leading cause of death for this age group is suicide. This alarming statistic displays that as a community we are hurting each other and ultimately hurting ourselves. There are many ways to combat this issue. Some suggestions are to put yourself in someone else’s shoes and learn about others as it decreases ignorance and increases compassion. The next time you have an urge to be upset at someone else, try to be kind. Observe how people react when you demonstrate an act of kindness. There is so much you get back from being kind.




(Rebroadcast) Charity: Giving any Gift: Reverend Ed Hansen

Wednesday, December 24, 2014 This week’s episode focused on charity and its importance. Charity is voluntary, not something we have to do. It is any gift of love we chose to provide where there are no expectations of anything in return. It is to give freely and lovingly. There are many benefits to the act of charity. It’s important to realize we live in a community and belong to one another. If we are going to improve life for all of us we have to do a part in helping this world be a better place. It is our duty to God to enhance the quality of life for everyone in the community; we are not isolated entities, but rather interwoven together. When someone is a giver, God brings more their way. The speakers remind the listening audience to not only give during the holidays. Instead, we should let the light of giving flicker throughout the year.




What They Haven't Told You About Ebola. Dr. Samuel Shacks, Dr. Shirley Evers-Manly

Wednesday, December 17, 2014 On this broadcast, Drs. Samuel Shacks and Dr. Shirley Evers-Manly give information regarding the Ebola virus and the 2014 outbreak. They explain what a virus is, how it reproduces and how it can spread. They share how this virus is not a new virus, but has been in nature in once undisturbed areas such as the rainforests. These areas are now being entered by humans due to development or displacement. Similar viruses have also appeared in other regions of the world including the U.S. and South America. The Drs. talk about some of the issues regarding the Ebola outbreak that were not widely covered in the media such as its emotional toll as well as the cultural factors that contributes to the spread of the virus. Also discussed is the medical response to the current outbreak and any disparities associated to the response. The doctors also discuss that at the moment there is no cure or functional treatment, but traditional care can be helpful, providing an affected person with water, other liquids and electrolytes can be effective in treating a person and leading to recovering. Announcements: Emergency Food Center every second and fourth Saturday at 9:30 am, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Center 1511 E. 52nd St., Los Angeles, CA, 310-630-9530 Lavonne Spicer Moore.




Growing Past Grief: Reverend Ed Hansen, Reverend Cecil Murray

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 Reverend’s Cecil Murray and Ed Hansen talk about the grief and the various forms of loss that can cause it, from having a loved one pass away to having had a divorce. They explain that grief is healthy and natural; however it should not get to the point to where one cannot live one’s life properly. People should look to the future, be positive and be able to move forward and not hold on to the past. The length of one’s grief can vary from person to person. The reverends also talk about how males are less likely to show their grief or emotions due to social stigmas. They encourage men to release when necessary because suppressing emotions can cause other health issues or lead to violent outbursts. The reverends also share how religion and faith can be useful tools for dealing with grief or helping someone else with their grief even if they are not religious. Having support groups whether they are friends, family or counselors are also said to be great tools for dealing with grief. Reverend Ed Hansen suggests that people be willing to reach out and take help from others through their time of grief. Reverend Cecil Murray similarly suggests that one love God, oneself, and your neighbor.




All About Gout: Dr. Mario Pacada

Wednesday, December 03, 2014 On this weeks broadcast, Dr. Mario Pacada explains what gout is, what functions in the body lead to it, the various symptoms and treatments available to alleviate flare ups related to gout. Gout is a type of arthritis. He talks about the excruciating pain that gout can cause. Dr. Pacada shares that gout is usually based in the elbows, toes, hands, knees and heel. Also covered are the foods and activities that can cause flare ups to occur. Dr. Pacada talks about how while some medications can help alleviate or cure the pain some can cause flare ups such as hypertension medications or water pills. He suggests that these medications be regulated properly in cases of gout. Stress is also a trigger of gout and gout flare ups. Dr. Pacada shares that a cortisone injection is a very helpful treatment for gout flare ups. It can provide months to years of relief depending on the person. Dr. Pacada goes over certain home remedies that can or can’t help with gout pain. Dr. Pacada announces that his office will offer complimentary foot and leg massages to “Good News Radio Magazine” listeners. Announcements: Dr. Mario Pacada’s office is located at 575 E. Hardy St. Ste. 205, Inglewood, CA 90301, 310-419-4733, manager.pacadadpm@yahoo.com; join the Hip Hop Café which will focus on HIV prevention at Grace Methodist Church on Saturday December 6th from 12-3pm; CDU farmers market every Sunday from 10 am- 2 pm at Vermont Village; Femaales project looks to reduce HIV in African American women, you can call 323-379-2050 or www.femaales.org; Vitamin D study at Charles R. Drew University, for more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709; call 424- 260-6543 for the Southern Los Angeles and Patient Navigation Wellness Center, this center focus is to help reduce the burden of cancer in the community.




Healthy Holiday Food Preparation and Giving Thanks: Dr. Carolyn Rowley, Reverend Joe Waller

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 Dr. Carolyn Rowley shares healthy holiday food preparation tips from baking instead of frying to using alternative spices in place of salt. She recommends if salt must be used to use sea salt which is natural and unprocessed. Dr. Rowley also gives alternative preparation styles for many of the traditional side dishes and desserts usually prepared for the Thanksgiving feast. She shares a few recipes from her own vegan diet such as one for yams and green beans that are healthy and taste great as well as introducing some non-traditional dish recipes that can be incorporated as part of a meal. For everyday eating Dr. Rowley shares her 3-4-4 meal plan which is a daily 3 meal plan layout for eating well and healthy. A final suggestion she makes is to switch from plastic storage containers to glass containers. Reverend Joe Waller adds to the conversation by sharing how to keep positive energy during the holidays and focusing on the good and giving thanks for it. Reverend Waller continues by giving some advice on how to express and show gratitude. One of his main methods is to be charitable. Reverend Waller shares a few scriptures that invoke the messages, emotions and feelings he talks about. Announcements: The listening audience is encouraged to join the Hip Hop Café which will focus on HIV prevention at Grace Methodist Church on Saturday December 6th from 12-3pm.




Sickle Cell Disease: Pat Corley

Wednesday, November 19, 2014 There are many types of sickle cell disease with sickle cell anemia being one form of sickle cell disease. Sickle cell anemia is the pure form of the disease which means it was inherited from both parents. This causes the red blood cell to form into a sickle shape. Many people who have this develop jaundice, are very tired, may have pain, and become dehydrated easily. Most babies born after 1990 have been screened for this disease. Sickle cell can cause many various complications such as stroke, heart issues, gall bladder disease, and decaying of bones to name a few. There are about 70,000-100,000 cases of sickle cell disease every year. It is important to know what hemoglobin type you have and what your partner has. For more information you can call the sickle cell disease organization of America at 410-528-1855 or visit them at sicklecelldisease.org. Sickle Cell Disease foundation of California can also provide more information by visiting their website at scdfc.org. Announcements: For those interested in the Femaales project which looks to reduce HIV, a study collaboration between UCLA and CDU, you can call 323-379-2050. Everyone is also encouraged to visit the CDU farmers market every Sunday from 10 am- 2 pm at Vermont Village.




Foot Care: Dr. Mario Pacada

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 This week’s episode focused on foot care. Of all the bones in our body about 25% of them are contained in the foot. The foot is a dynamic structure because it takes a lot of pounding over the span of a lifetime. Many African Americans and Hispanics have foot issues that lead to amputation due to diabetes. This is due many times to lack of health care, but also because many people in these communities rely solely on faith. Faith goes hand in hand with proper health care. Many times physicians also do not look at patient’s feet in a routine check-up visit. It is recommended to get your feet checked at least once a year to ensure proper health and care. To maintain proper foot care it is also recommended to do calf pumping exercises, stretching of the muscles, and toe raises. Announcements: The listening audience is encouraged to join the Hip Hop Café which will focus on HIV prevention at Grace Methodist Church on Saturday December 6th from 12-3pm




Physician Assistants: Katayoun Moini

Wednesday, November 05, 2014 Professor Katayoun Moini, Director of the CDU Physician Assistant (PA) program, explains what a physician assistant is trained to do and where you would encounter one. She also shares how getting treated by a physician assistant compares to being seen by a medical doctor in all areas including quality of service and cost. Usually a person who gets medical treatment is seen by a physician assistant without knowing it. Professor Moini clarifies that a physician assistant is a very well trained medical expert who can provide the necessary medical assistance. She announces that the CDU physician assistant program will be starting in August of 2015 and what qualifications are required of any candidate interested in applying for the CDU program or any other PA program.




Children's Cancers: Dr. Jacqueline Casillas

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 This week’s episode is about Cancer in Children. Children getting cancer is much more rare than it is in adults; however, it has a great impact on them throughout their life. There are about 12,400 children diagnosed under the age of 15 which extends into about 70,000 young people being diagnosed with cancer. In over 95% of the cases, the reason for cancer is unknown. There have not been any significant disparities in cancers affecting groups of color. Sometimes, it can be difficult to detect cancer in children early on. Many times it can be confused with the flu or ignored entirely. It is a cause for concern if children have gone through several rounds of antibiotics for a cold or flu, and have not gotten better. It is also cause for concern if a child is fatigued, pale, or complains about pain for several weeks. When this occurs it is important to get a child’s blood work done along with X-rays and various other tests to ensure everything is healthy. Two-thirds of children cancer survivors also suffer long term effects such as second cancers, injury to the brain that causes slower learning, and heart or lung injuries. Of the cancer survivors, 25% die at an early age. Dr. Casillas is involved with Padres Contra Cancer which is a program that gives support to families who have someone suffering from cancer or are cancer survivors. All families from all backgrounds are invited. For more information you can visit www.Iamhope.org.




Brain Tumors: Dr. Leia Nghiemphu, Kacee Sims, Dorothy Wilmore

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 This week’s episode focused on brain tumors. Specifically, on Primary brain tumors which are tumors that start from cells that are part of the brain. However, there are about 100 types of brain tumors that exist. The majority of brain tumors usually come from something called astrocytes. Early symptoms of brain tumors are headaches that occur in the morning as you wake up. Seizures as well as loss of motor skills are also symptoms that are often seen. Most common types of brain tumors are from a group called gliomas. There are different grades of gliomas with 1 being slow growing up to 4 being the fastest growing. If any symptoms seem to be occurring it is important to visit your physician and ask for various tests to be done to ensure everything is okay. Providers, care givers, community members, and families are invited to participate in a free conference Building bridges to optimum Health: Autism. It will take place on October 23rd at 3320 W Adams 90018. CDU Saturday Science Academy will also be hosting a 5K on October 25th, for more information call 323- 563-4926. Lastly, on October 24th a Pink bag lunch and Hispanic Heritage Event will take place from 11 am – 2 pm at 4920 S Avalon 90011. For more information call 323-232-4391.




Female Sexuality: Dr. Nina Harawa, Rae Shaw, Michelle Cantu

Wednesday, October 15, 2014 Female sexuality refers to many things such as behavior, health, and self-concept of woman as sexual beings. STD’s such as Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis are prevalent diseases that have been reported in the LA County health division. In 2012, there were over 63,000 cases of STD’s reported in LA County alone. There are about 48,000 cases of Chlamydia, over 11, 000 cases of Gonorrhea, and about 2,000 cases of Syphilis. The rate for Chlamydia in African American women between the ages of 15 and 24 is 10 times that of white women. The rate for Gonorrhea is about 20 times more in African American women than their white women counterparts. Many women don’t know they have STD’s because they can be asymptomatic which can lead to further complications such as an inflamed pelvis, miscarriages, ectopic pregnancies, and infertility. The guest speakers are part of the Femaales Project, an intervention research study for black women which is a collaboration between CDU, UCLA, and JWCH. This is the first large scale trial where the Femaales intervention is compared to an intervention that JWCH has been doing for many years. The goal is to see which practices are the most effective in women suffering from various STD’s and other female related issues. For more information call 323 379-2050 or visit www.femaales.org. Community members are invited to also attend Building bridges to optimum health event: Autism Free conference on October 23rd from 8 am to 3:30 pm. It will take place at 3320 West Adams Blvd in Los Angeles. For more information call 323- 292- 2002 or visit haafii.org. There is also a Cancer Awareness Fundraiser on October 26th at 3:30 pm at the Shiloh Mission Church located at 1511 E. 52nd St. Los Angeles. 90011.




(Rebroadcast) Compassion: Dr. David Martins, Reverend Russell Thornhill

Wednesday, October 08, 2014 Compassion is the consciousness to other’s misfortunes, life challenges, and life circumstances. It is also described as the capacity for being moved by the suffering of others and wanting to alleviate people from such suffering. The various components to compassion are generosity, hospitality, tolerance, and sensitivity. Many chronic diseases that are stress related could be reduced tremendously with a more compassionate society. By showing compassion and care for others, it can also bring tranquility and peace into your own life. It takes you away from your own life fears and stresses as you become focused trying to help others. The listening audience is reminded to be compassionate by volunteering time, giving, loving, and caring for those around them.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, October 01, 2014 This week’s episode featured Dr. Carlisle, president of Charles R. Drew University with updates about the University. Firstly, he announced two new board members to CDU, Dr. Clarence Shields and Jaime Contreras who is a post baccalaureate student. Also, the university will be celebrating Dr. Meryvn M. Dymally who was one of the first African American Lieutenant Governors in Congress. SB-26 was authored by Dr. Meryvn M. Dymally and signed by President Ronald Regan. It gave permanent state funding to Charles R. Drew University. From September 15th - October 15th the university will also be celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. The 4th annual CDU unity day will be taking place on Friday October 10th. Its purpose is to bring together faculty, staff, and students. The 2nd annual nursing conference “Answering the Call to Military Families” will take place on October 27th. The university is also the recipient of a few grants such as from the California Endowment which gave $900,000 as well as $15 million dollars that was awarded for the next 5 years for the renewal of the AXIS grant. This year CDU is also a sponsor for Taste of Soul which is taking place on Saturday October 18th from 10am-7pm. The listening audience is encouraged to attend these events. For more information on the University visit www.cdrewu.edu.




(Rebroadcast) Purposful Parenting: Anthony Young, Dorothy Sims-Wilmore

Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Purposeful parenting is to build a strong and positive relationship between the parent and child. It is not dependent on the setting of the children, but rather the character of the parents who raise the children. It is vital to always talk to your children and encourage them to accomplish career and life goals. It is encouraged to always be proactive in a child’s life to help and strengthen their self-esteem, character, and morale. It is also important in purposeful parenting to give children a point of reference to learn morals and values. It can be religious, cultural, or even the American Values. Purposeful parenting can direct a child towards a happy, well balanced and fulfilled adult life. It fosters positive attitudes which can bring happiness into the home as well as the greater society.




Bike L.A.: Bicyclist Friendly Projects in L.A.: Andres Ramirez, Tafarai Bayne

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 Bike riding has many benefits as it reduces traffic congestion, brings people closer to their neighborhoods, and improves health. However, Los Angeles was designed as a motorist city. With higher rates of unemployment more people are steering away from motorized vehicles. BIKE LA’s mission is to make cities navigable by multiple modes of transportation and figuring out ways that roads can safely be shared. According to a study done by Healthy Plan for Los Angeles, 11% of the population in South LA do not have a car. This is 11% of about 900,000 people. According to the same study, 9 out of 10,000 pedestrians are getting hit and 4.1 people on bikes get hit out of every 10,000. Many times when drivers go fast their scope of vision is narrowed and hindered. It is important to be conscious of your speed as a motorist and keep 3 feet away from sidewalks. There are various projects that are ongoing to promote biking and safety. Cyclavia is an event that will allow a city to close a street down to car traffic and open it up to pedestrians and bicyclists. There are lively activities that occur on the 6 mile stretch of street. October 5th and December 7th will be the two Cyclavia events in Los Angeles. There is also a middle school project that is trying to correlate physical activity and focus. Bikes have been donated to a Physical Education department to teach and encourage youth to bike. For more information visit TrustSouthLa.org or cyclavia.org. Participants are also needed for a Vitamin D Study taking place at CDU For more information call 323-249-5709.The Men’s cancer network will also be presenting “Saving our men: Prostate cancer awareness rally and event” on Saturday Sept 20. To participate call 213-909-7519




Eating Your Fruits and Vegetables: Gwendolyn Moore, Cynthia Davis

Wednesday, September 10, 2014 This week’s episode was on the importance of eating fruits and vegetables. They are vital to one’s health because they are fresh and full of antioxidants, vital chemicals, enzymes, organic water, vitamins and minerals. They also help in protecting the body’s cells and DNA. The American Cancer Association recommends 5-9 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables per day. Taking in more fruits and vegetables can help people with Hypertension as it will provide them with an increased amount of potassium, magnesium, and calcium that is vital in managing the condition. Those who have diabetes can increase their fiber intake by eating more raw and uncooked vegetables and fruits. It is important to have as much organic fruits and vegetables to avoid harmful chemicals and pesticides that strip nutrients from the product. Cheaper options are to plant your own seeds and grow your own fruits and vegetables. Frozen fruits and vegetables are also cheaper and a great option. To purchase organic products, the listening audience is invited to visit the CDU Farmers Market on Sundays at 7901 S. Vermont Ave. from 10 am -2pm.




Gang Member's Health Issues: Father Greg Boyle, Jose Real

Wednesday, September 03, 2014 Gang members tend to experience more physical, emotional and spiritual health problems than those who are not in a gang. Many gang members are pushed into it by the circumstances they are living in. It is difficult for them to visualize or fathom a prosperous and normal future because of the distress they suffer starting at a young age. Many of them have had to deal with violence, drugs, trauma, and abandonment within the home as they were growing up. Children don’t often choose gangs. Instead, they are trying to flee from the pain at home and are in search of someone to take them in. In a mental health study that interviewed 108 gang members, 50% were found to have an anxiety disorder, 85% were diagnosed with a personality disorder, and 25% were screened positive for psychosis. Home Boy Industries is an organization that was founded in 1992 by the speaker, Father Greg Boyle. It seeks to help gang members through many different services. Every Monday and Wednesday they have a mobile clinic where gang members can get initial check-ups and can discuss any health complaints or issues. Those who enroll into Home Boy industries are assigned a case manager that can serve as a support system. For more information visit www.homeboyindustries.org.




Autism: Dr. Themba Carr, Dr. Connie Casari

Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Autism spectrum disorder is a neuro developmental disorder. There are no biological markers or medical tests for autism. Instead, it is usually defined by behaviors that manifest across three main areas. The first area of concern is with communication. There is either a delay in communication or a child may not be able to communicate at all. Secondly, it affects Social interaction, how children interact with others. Lastly it affects their restricted and repetitive behaviors. Autism can be diagnosed as young as 2 years old and sometimes even younger. There has been a lot of research advances, however the cause for autism is still unknown. It is thought to be a genetic disorder. It is important to look for symptoms of autism to have a better outcome for a child’s future. In California there are regional centers where children can get evaluated and receive free services. There are several ongoing studies at the Center for Autism and Treatment at UCLA. This center has also partnered with Healthy African American Families II (HAAF) to bring awareness and promote access to services in the African American community. For more information on Autism visit the website for Center for Autism and Treatment at UCLA. Resources: The listening audience is invited to participate in a Vitamin D study at Charles R. Drew University. For more information call Caroline Farodolu at 323 249-5709. There is also a free disaster awareness course being offered Saturday September 27th from 9 am to 12 pm at 3501 W Adams Blvd., Los Angeles. 90008. To sign up email dac92714@gmail.com. Lastly, the CDU Farmers Market takes place every Sunday from 10 am to 2 pm. For further information, call: 323 563-9309.




Homeless Health Crisis: Hazel Lopez, Zina Love, Delvin Kinchlow

Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Homeless adults are hospitalized 4-5 times more than the rate of the general population. They are also hospitalized 100 times more frequently for psychiatric causes. 51,000 people in LA County are currently homeless. Of those, 85% or more are suffering from health issues. In LA county a coordinated assessment tool is used that takes into account a person’s length of homelessness as well as their medical condition and risky behaviors they engage in. Since September of last year 6,500 people have been assessed using this tool. Based on the data from this tool, more than half reported having mental health issues, liver disease, heart disease, diabetes, HIV/Aids, skin infections, or substance abuse issues. About 55% reported that in the last 3 months they have visited an emergency room 1-3 times. Organizations such as LAMP and House of UHURU serve as Medicare certified wellness centers where men and woman can access healthcare and health programs. When someone enters the ER, they can be discharged to the LAMP site. For more information on the House of UHURU please call 323 568-5400. For more information on LAMP you can visit www.Lampcommunity.org or call 488-9559.




Mrs. Lillian Harkless Mobley Memorial: Kenneth Mobley, Chioma Agbahiwe

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 This week’s episode focused on the life and achievements of Lillian Mobley who passed away July 18th 2011. She had a lasting legacy in the community she cared for, and also had a role in establishing CDU. Early on she became involved with Neighborhood Adult Participant Project, and became the director of the center. She established this center and when funding was lost she ventured out to establish her own non-profit, which was the South Central Multi-Purpose Senior Citizen Center. During those years she ran her own organization and helped numerous other organizations in the South LA/Watts communities. She also assisted when CDU was being founded as well as King/Drew Medical Magnet School. She also started the Watts Towers community action council which is its own non-profit. It oversees the projects that take place at Watts towers. She was the chair of the advisory committee at Maxine Waters Center. She was very instrumental in the community because she wanted them to have the same resources as other more privileged communities. The guest speakers encourage the listening audience to visit www.Lillianmobeleycenter.org or call 323-319 1986 for more questions or information. Donations can also be made on their website to help in the cause of continuing her legacy. Listeners are also encouraged to participate in the various activities and programs that are offered through the South Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center. For more information please call 424- 260-6543.




(Rebroadcast) Winning with Community: Loretta Jones, Dr. Paul Koegel

Wednesday, August 06, 2014 This weeks episode focused on Loretta Jones who has been an agent of change in the community for many years. Her love for community work began years ago when she realized not every person was allowed to vote. She speaks about the obstacles that she dealt with years ago and how many are still the same today. There is still a lack of housing, bad environments people reside in where they are exposed to many fast food restaurants, high unemployment rates, and institutional racism. She has spent years working with various CEO's from community based organizations who were also ready for change. It was a team that came together to help bring about change. She has a tremendous wealth of human resources as she has spent years developing relationships. Because of her unwavering dedication to the community and all that she has done, Loretta Jones was honored with receiving the Ruth Roemer Social Justice leader award. This award goes to a social justice advocate that made a difference in advancing and protecting health in vulnerable populations. She was also part of the team that was awarded the Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2014 Team Science Award.




L.A. Park Deficit: Robert Garcia, Dayana Molina

Wednesday, July 30, 2014 This week’s guests speak about The City Project which was started in the year 2000. The goal of this agency is to create equal access to parks and recreation for low income, underserved communities. Secondly, is figuring out related health concerns from the lack of physical activity and healthy eating in certain communities. Third is producing quality education which includes physical education and building new schools. Finally, providing economic vitality for all such as meaningful work, youth programs, and avoiding gentrification and displacement. Los Angeles is one of the most park poor major cities in the nation. There are less than 3 acres of parks per residence within the city. Together in partnership with over 70 various local organizations and leaders, they are trying to make L.A. a place that underserved people can benefit from. For more information, the guest speakers encourage to visit www.cityproject.ca.org or email at hello@cityproject.ca.org. Lastly, everyone is reminded to attend and support the Charles R. Drew University Farmers Market at Crenshaw Christian Center every Sunday from 10am- 2pm.




Compassion: Dr. David Martins, Reverend Russell Thornhill

Wednesday, July 23, 2014 Compassion is the consciousness to other’s misfortunes, life challenges, and life circumstances. It is also described as the capacity for being moved by the suffering of others and wanting to alleviate people from such suffering. The various components to compassion are generosity, hospitality, tolerance, and sensitivity. Many chronic diseases that are stress related could be reduced tremendously with a more compassionate society. By showing compassion and care for others, it can also bring tranquility and peace into your own life. It takes you away from your own life fears and stresses as you become focused trying to help others. The listening audience is reminded to be compassionate by volunteering time, giving, loving, and caring for those around them.




Not In My Back Yard: Neighborhood Environmental Health Advocacy: Nancy Halpern-Ibrahim, Monic Uriarte, Nallelie Cobo

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 Neighborhood Environmental advocacy is a term used when working to achieve comprehensive and long term community development. Esperanza Community Housing Corporation in South L.A. is an example of this. It started from a campaign of advocacy around displacement of long term community residents. They try to bring safe and affordable housing to the community. In South LA, many families noticed they had reoccurring visits to the emergency room for asthma attacks, nose bleeds, and various other health concerns. They later came to learn that this was the effect of the surrounding toxic environment they were living in. After many attempts to fight for safer conditions, on November 8th of 2013 Senator Boxer came out to do her own press conference, surrounded by community promotoras to publicly announce that Allen Co. needed to do something to improve the safety of the environment. Allen Co. finally closed last year in November. As of now there are 9 buildings of affordable and safe housing. The listening audience is encouraged to call 213-748-7285 if they notice any harmful things in the environment or if they are interested in helping with any of these efforts. Everyone is also encouraged to visit the CDU Farmers Market on Sundays from 10 am to 2 pm at Crenshaw Christian Center.




Purposeful Parenting: Anthony Young, Dorothy Sims-Wilmore

Wednesday, July 09, 2014 Purposeful parenting is to build a strong and positive relationship between the parent and child. It is not dependent on the setting of the children, but rather the character of the parents who raise the children. It is vital to always talk to your children and encourage them to accomplish career and life goals. It is encouraged to always be proactive in a child’s life to help and strengthen their self-esteem, character, and morale. It is also important in purposeful parenting to give children a point of reference to learn morals and values. It can be religious, cultural, or even the American Values. Purposeful parenting can direct a child towards a happy, well balanced and fulfilled adult life. It fosters positive attitudes which can bring happiness into the home as well as the greater society.




Hepatitis: Dr. Derrick Butler, David Marshall Sr.

Wednesday, July 02, 2014 Hepatitis is inflammation or damage to the Liver. It can be caused by many different toxic substances such as drugs and alcohol. It can also develop from autoimmune diseases or infections. Hepatitis can also be caused by infections or bacteria which are better known as Hepatitis A, B, and C. The difference between the three lies in how they are spread or transmitted, and what their long term consequences can be. Hepatitis A is spread through the fecal oral root when foods or drinks are contaminated. Many times people recover from this. Hepatitis B and C are blood borne infections with exposure to used needles, blood transfusions, trauma, or sexual intercourse. Many times these two last for a life time. Current treatment cost $28,000 a month for 3 months. Although it is expensive, it has a 90% effective rate in curing the disease. Consequences of not treating this disease can lead to liver cancer, cirrhosis, or the need for a liver transplant. This can be a fatal and serious disease if not treated properly. Because of this, it is important to use your health care professional to benefit you.




Hazards and Benefits of Aspirin: Dr. David Martins, Norma Mtume

Wednesday, June 25, 2014 Aspirin originally was created to help with pain, fevers, and inflammatory conditions. Later it was found that it had a side effect which prevents the body’s ability to clot blood. Normally, when there is a cut in the body, platelets come together to clot the blood. Aspirin prevents the platelets from coming together. Strokes and heart attacks are caused when the plaque in the blood vessel build up and ruptures it. When it ruptures the platelets try to seal it up and in the process cut the blood flow through the blood vessel. This leads to every organ and cell beyond the point of obstruction to lose its blood supply. If it happens in the brain it is called a stroke and if it happens in the heart it is called a heart attack. When a person is on aspirin, the plaque may rupture but the likelihood of the platelets plugging up the rupture is less with aspirin. Those who are at risk for heart attack or stroke, usually those that have diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol, are usually given aspirin. However, there has to be a balance and all risks have to be determined prior to taking aspirin daily. It is vital to talk to your physician about all the possible risks and future complications that may occur by taking aspirin. Every individual has different risk factors that may or may not make taking aspirin beneficial or harmful. Because of this, patients are urged to always be informed and proactive in their health.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 This week’s guest speaker was Dr. David Carlisle, President of Charles R. Drew University, who presented all the current updates of the University. May 31st marked the 30th anniversary for CDU. It also culminated its second largest class of 306 students in this year’s graduation ceremony. The New Presidential medal was received by Tim Watkins, son of Ted Watkins, who contributed a lot to the Watts community. The honorary degree was received by the notable daughter of the university’s namesake, Sylvia Drew-Ivie. Also, during the 2014 match for residency, 77% of the medical students matched into a primary care specialty and 20% matched into family medicine. Additionally, the Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing has recently enrolled new students into the bridges to doctorate program at UCLA; there is a cohort of 9 students. The university also recently had a major grant, AXIS, scored by the National Institute of Health, and is currently in the number one position. CDU has also received an award from the California Community foundation to re-open the Physician’s Assistant program, which shut down 5 years ago. Lastly, the audience is invited to the 8th Annual Charles R. Drew Blood Drive. More information can be found on the university website. The audience is also encouraged to call 424- 260-6543 for the Southern Los Angeles and Patient Navigation Wellness Center. This centers focus is to help reduce the burden of cancer in the community.




PEP & PrEP: Dr. Ida Jean Davis, Kenneth Almanza

Wednesday, June 11, 2014 PEP and PrEP are the two bio medical interventions and preventions available for HIV. PrEP works on a person that is HIV negative. The medication that is used is called Truvada which is taken every day like a birth control pill. The other bio medical intervention is called PEP, which is used within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV. Truvada is also used with PEP. Truvada is a preventive type of medication that blocks the replication of the HIV virus. It is 98% effective if used as directed. Post exposure prophylactic is a program at Oasis clinic for those that have been exposed to HIV within 72 hours of the call, and will be treated at no cost. Pre-exposure prophylactic is the ongoing study at the Oasis clinic that is looking for participants who are Men who have Sex with Men (MSM’s) over the age of 18 and have had anal sex with men over the past 6 months. To learn more the audience is invited to call 310 668-4213. For information on PEP ask for Jose, and for information on PrEP contact David. Other community resources are the Southern LA Patient Navigation and Wellness Center which helps with the prevention and control of cancer. For more information you can call 424- 260- 6543 or email at pnwc12@gmail.com. There is also the weekly CDU farmers market that takes place on Sunday’s from 10 am- 2 pm at 7901 South Vermont Avenue.




Top 5 Health Concerns for Black Men: Dr. Randall Maxey, Dr. Derrick Butler

Wednesday, June 04, 2014 There are 5 top health concerns for black men which disproportionately affect them. The fifth health concern is male sexual dysfunction which is the inability to maintain a strong erection to consummate sexual activity. As a man grows older especially if obese, diabetic, or has hypertension they are more likely to have sexual dysfunction. The fourth health concern is HIV/AIDS which statistically affects 1 in 50 black men in the United States. Next is prostate cancer which is a disease that can be inherited through blood relatives. The top two health concerns are diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Many of these diseases can lead to depression, psychological problems, obesity, other health diseases, and even death. The guest speakers emphasize the importance of addressing these issues in the community and in churches. They also advise black men and their families to get access to care and get checked regularly by their physicians. Taking preventive measures of getting basic screenings done can increase life span and quality of life. Lastly, they leave the audience with a closing message for men to take as good a care of their body as they do their car.




Youth in Transition: Lianne Goldsmith, Shari Walker

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 This week’s episode is on youth in transition. The saying “Aging Out” of the foster care system is used when referring to children who have remained within the foster care system until they are 18 or 21 years of age. Once they reach this age and have not been adopted or reunified with their family, they are sent out to live on their own. Some states are working on changing the age of youth that have to leave the foster care system to 21. California has passed this law already. Many young adults who have been in foster care for many years have moved from home to home. Many average about 14-15 different homes in their young life. Because of this, their education is halted throughout the time, and many times their paperwork is lost. This leaves many young adults without a proper and full education which has ramifications on their employment and lives. Many of them end up in prison or pregnant. In hopes of providing a brighter future for such young adults, the Youth in Transition program was developed. It consists of 3 components that provide support. There is Co-mentoring that allows for young adults and adults to work together in a symbiotic manner. There is also a 5 week internship program that is tailored to each individual youth. Lastly, there is an App that brings all resources on foster care together. If interested in volunteering or getting more information about the Youth in Transition program, the listening audience is encouraged to call 213-365-2900. The audience is also invited to the Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center for a wellness and nutrition program that seeks to help those affected by cancer. For more information call 424-260-6543 or email at Pnwc12@gmail.com. Lastly, there will be an Obesity Symposium held on May 29th at Home and United Methodist Church.




Foster Care and Adoption: Robyn Harrod, Deondri Ruff

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 Foster care or foster families are a substitute for birth families that cannot take care of their children at the time. This is usually due to safety reasons. Many times children come in to the foster care system because of abuse or neglect. Foster care is meant to be temporary until the birth family does what they need to do to provide a safe environment for their children. Adoption is a permanent situation in which the parental rights of the birth parents are terminated. Adoptive parents have all legal rights of the child as if they gave birth to him/her. The guest speakers are from a private nonprofit foster and adoption agency called Southern California Foster Family and Adoption. Through this agency they contract with the department of family and children services to train and certify families as foster and adoptive families. They also then place children within those families. This agency also works with birth parents to give them skills and proper training on caring for their children. The goal of SCFFA is to place children within capable families who will provide them with the best care.




When a Stroke Strikes: Dr. Lucas Restrepo, Dr. James McGregor

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 This week’s episode focused on strokes. A stroke is a brain illness caused by a clot that blocks an artery of the brain, which damages a part of it. This is known as ischemic and makes up about 85% of strokes. The other 15% known as hemorrhagic is when an artery is affected and breaks causing bleeding to occur. Risk factors for stroke are diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, and drinking. Those that have such risk factors can sometimes begin developing small infarcts. Sometimes, one can see symptoms of a stroke and should call 911. Some of these symptoms can include numbness or crookedness of the face, sudden loss in arm strength, or not being able to speak properly. The sooner one seeks medical attention the better chances there are to salvage any brain damage. Strokes can unfortunately happen to anyone; however, one of the most important risk factors for strokes is high blood pressure. Those with high blood pressure have an increased risk, 18 times, of stroke. To help prevent strokes blood thinners can be taken, diet and lifestyle should improve, and drinking or smoking should be eliminated.




(Rebroadcast) How to Measure Blood Pressure: Dr. David Martins, Laurice Pitts

Wednesday, May 07, 2014 The guest speakers of this week’s episode taught necessary skills to the audience on how to properly take blood pressure and understand what it means. When a patient is taken in for measurement, it should be a quiet room to allow for relaxation. It is important that the patients arm circumference is measured to make sure proper cuff size is being used. It is also important for the medical staff to ensure the patient has kept away from caffeine or smoking 30 minutes prior. There is no such thing as a normal blood pressure reading; however, it is vital to keep it under 120 over 80. Anything above this can be considered pre- hypertension or hypertension. It’s common that people take their medication only when they think their blood pressure may be elevated. The guest speakers leave the audience with important advice to keep up with blood pressure medication regimens as prescribed.




(Rebroadcast) Healing the Mind and Stress on the Body

Wednesday, April 30, 2014 Stress is anything, internally or externally, that triggers us to make some kind of reaction. Usually it comes from something that is perceived as a fear or a threat. It is inevitable that stress will come into our life at some point, but it is important to remember that there is no weapon that the world has that will bring us down. God is the best of planners and He makes everything work out for our good. Stress can sometimes guide us just as pain guides us, to have more mindful or healthy coping. Physically it can lead to agitation, high blood pressure, ulcers, headaches, migraines, or heart disease. If it’s a constant psychological stress it can overwhelm a person. Because of this it is important to name your stressors and understand what parts of the body it affects. Alongside with that, it is important to develop a stronger connection with God, and have trust in His plan.




Winning with Community: Loretta Jones, Dr. Paul Koegel

Wednesday, April 23, 2014 This weeks episode focused on Loretta Jones who has been an agent of change in the community for many years. Her love for community work began years ago when she realized not every person was allowed to vote. She speaks about the obstacles that she dealt with years ago and how many are still the same today. There is still a lack of housing, bad environments people reside in where they are exposed to many fast food restaurants, high unemployment rates, and institutional racism. She has spent years working with various CEO's from community based organizations who were also ready for change. It was a team that came together to help bring about change. She has a tremendous wealth of human resources as she has spent years developing relationships. Because of her unwavering dedication to the community and all that she has done, Loretta Jones was honored with receiving the Ruth Roemer Social Justice leader award. This award goes to a social justice advocate that made a difference in advancing and protecting health in vulnerable populations. She was also part of the team that was awarded the Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2014 Team Science Award.




Alcoholism in the Family: Dr. Wanda Jewell, Jose Real

Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Alcoholism is an addiction to the liquid drug called alcohol. A person continues to drink regardless of negative consequences and is unable to stop on their own. It is a progressive addiction because tolerance is built for alcohol which leads to needing more. People who become alcoholic begin to become irresponsible in other matters of life as well. Some informal tests to see if you are an alcoholic are to set a limit of one to two drinks or set a certain amount of days you will abstain from alcohol. If you are able to keep to this then you may not be an alcoholic. One of the guest speakers discusses his journey of becoming an alcoholic at the young age of 10 years old. Through his 20's and early 30's he was involved in gangs, an unhealthy marriage full of drugs and alcohol, and constantly in and out of incarceration. It wasn't until he felt he needed to change that he was able to wean off the alcohol through help from a pastor, support groups, and a sponsor. The guest speakers invite the listening audience to call 323-664-1846 or Los Angeles Centers for Alcohol and Drug Abuse at 562-906-2676 if they think they have a drinking problem. Help is available through 12 step programs, AA, Allenon, or various treatment options that can be found online. Lastly, the audience is invited to join in a free symposium “In my name: mitigating barriers to male mobility” For more information or to register visit www.HAAFII.org.




Importance of Family Support when Coping with Adversity: Kacee Sims, Dorothy Wilmore

Wednesday, April 09, 2014 This weeks episode focused on the importance of Family Support when Coping with Adversity. The guest speakers were Kacee Sims, a woman that had to endure various surgeries to remove a tumor, as well as her mother Dorothy Wilmore who was her support. Kacee explains her journey full of struggles and how her mother was her unwavering support system throughout her journey, which really helped her to be successful. There is a lot one can do for a family member with or without money such as helping wash clothes, run errands, making a meal, making a phone call to check on them regularly, or simply visiting them. There are also many free classes and resources that are offered throughout the community. Many times the one receiving care becomes the agent of change for a family by increasing love, appreciating every blessing more, or making healthy lifestyle changes. In Dorothy and Kacee's experience they learned to view health as a mental, physical, and spiritual thing which has now improved their overall well-being. The hosts ended the episode by inviting the listening audience to the CDU farmers market that takes place every Friday from 10-2 pm on 7901 S. Vermont Ave in LA.




Gay Today, Straight Tomorrow: The Perplexing Mystery of Sexual Identity"

Wednesday, April 02, 2014 This weeks episode focused on the journey of 2 individuals who struggled with their sexual orientation. There are many men who struggle with who they are early on in life. There is a study that shows that 37% of the men surveyed ages 16-55 had at least one same sex sexual experience. However, only 10% of the men in the survey actually identified as homosexual. Furthermore, this shows that these men experimented and tried figuring out who they were in terms of their sexuality, later to find that perhaps they were heterosexual. The speakers encourage parents to support and love their children if they are homosexual because God loves everyone deeply. These children also need a support system to prevent them from doing harmful things such as drugs. The speakers also encourage individuals who are internally struggling with their sexual orientation to love themselves the way they are, and to ask God for his strength.




Juvenile Incarceration and Recidivism: Dr. Elizabet Barnert, Dr. Raymond Perry

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 This weeks episode focused on a community partnered research study by Dr. Perry and Dr. Barnet on how adolescent factors predicted incarcerated outcomes from adolescence through adulthood. The study was done with a partnership between UCLA, Juvenile Court Services, and the probation department. There were two parts to the study. The first being secondary analysis of already existing national data on adolescent factors that impacted recidivism, which is being incarcerated or arrested repeatedly. Some of the factors looked at were personal, family, and community characteristics. The second part of the study included interviewing 20 incarcerated youth in the LA County. Most of the youth interviewed were Latino or African American. Every day there are about 1,800-2,000 youth between the ages of 12-18 years who are detained in the juvenile system. The study was done to gain knowledge on ways to keep children out of such a system. The ultimate goal is to be able to give each children proper education, healthcare services, mental health services, and appropriate resources to empower and help them stay on the right path.




(Rebroadcast) Colorectal Cancer Awareness: Dr. Derrick Butler

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 Colon cancer is the 3rd most common cancer in the United States amongst men and women. It is the second cause of death in United states. Colon cancer disproportionately affects the African American community. Most people do not have any symptoms until the cancer has elevated to an advanced stage. Some of the typical symptoms are bleeding in the stool, changes in your bowel habits, unexplained weight loss, or abdominal pain. It is advised to get such symptoms investigated should they present themselves. The vast majority of people diagnosed with colon cancer are over their 50s. After this age it is important to get a sigmoidoscopy done every year along with a stool test, as this can be done easily. However it doesn’t look as far in the colon as a colonoscopy. It just looks at 2/3 of colon where 90 percent of cancer is. A Colonoscopy on the other hand can be done every 10 years as this is a more invasive test which can look at the entire colon. The guest speakers suggest everyone take Metamucil regardless of age as it is a high source of fiber. This can be important in a diet as it helps speed bowel movements which can ultimately help prevent colon cancer.




American Red Cross: CDU's Namesake and the Organization Today: Sylvia Drew Ivie, Darrin Greenlee, Dr. Joy Fridey

Wednesday, March 12, 2014 This week’s episode focused on the inception of the American Red Cross, and blood research that advanced our health system. Dr. Charles R. Drew was born in 1904 and did pivotal research work in blood preservation. He discovered a way to take plasma out from blood that could be stored for later use. After World War II he was invited to set up a blood bank in NYC where he became the director. In 1881 Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross as a way to meet the needs of the soldiers in the Civil War. She led it for 23 years. As health sciences progressed, surgeries and diseases became better known, making blood a vital treatment option. This was only made possible after the groundbreaking research discovery made by Dr. Drew. Over the years, the need to grow blood collections has increased. There needs to be about 1200 units of blood a day to meet the needs of Southern California residents alone. Any one is welcome and encouraged to donate blood as long as they meet the donor eligibility. More information on how to donate blood or pre-donation education material can be found at Redcrossblood.org or by calling 1-800-RED-CROSS.




Hom(e)ophobia: The Connection Between Love, Acceptance and HIV Prevention

Wednesday, March 05, 2014 This weeks episode focuses on homophobia within the Black and Latino community. The speakers discuss how they have seen many men under 30 who have been evicted from their homes and from their families because they were gay or HIV positive. Many are kicked out without any support or employment and end up engaging in risky behavior. Sometimes many end up with AIDS or commit suicide. Parents are encouraged to seek support from the church or from support groups such as Circle of Care which is a support group for parents of same gender loving children. There is also HOPE which is an organization for people empowerment geared towards youth. They discuss preventative healthcare and emotional health. The speakers encourage the listening audience to attend the forum Hom(e)ophobia: The Connection Between Love, Acceptance, and HIV Prevention. It will take place March 8th from 11 am to 2 pm at the Children's Hospital located at 4661 Sunset Blvd LA 90067. The speakers urge people to find help through support groups or from peers dealing with the same things before they get involved in dangerous situations.




Veteran's Health Issues: Dr. Bruce Kagan, Dr. Dean Norman, Mr. Q

Wednesday, February 26, 2014 This weeks episode focuses on the resources available to Veterans. There is a Veteran’s Affairs office which is a cabinet level department that reports directly to the President of US. The VA offices are put in place to care for those that have been in battle and to provide comprehensive health coverage to veterans. Last year the VA offices saw 86,000 unique veterans. Of those, 29,000 were seen for mental health issues and 9,700 were returning veterans from either Afghanistan or Iraq. There are a total of about 23 million veterans who live in the US from across all wars. The guest speakers encourage Veterans to utilize the resources available through the VA office as it is a right that has been earned. When a Veteran separates from the military the VA should be the first stop to be screened for any health issues so that adequate treatment can be given. Veterans have 5 years of health care and 3 years of dental health guaranteed. Many Veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This disorder can occur when someone goes through something traumatic such as war. Symptoms can include severe trouble sleeping, flashbacks of things they saw, being emotionally numb, anxiety, or being afraid of going out in public. Treatment options have expanded to various medications, cognitive behavioral therapy, and psychotherapy which has proven to be the most effective. It is vital to seek proper resources and to connect with people who have dealt with similar situations.




Obesity: Starting the Year Right and Setting Realistic Goals: Dr. David Martins

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 This weeks episode focuses on an epidemic in America, obesity. Obesity is when there is excess proportion of fat in your body or the Body Mass Index is 29.9 and above. Those that are considered overweight have a BMI between 25- 29.9. The prevalence of obesity in America is 1 in 3 people. There are many health consequences to being obese, having body fat in excess of 20 %. The most common are diabetes, high blood pressure, liver disease, cancers, and sometimes arthritis. These health risks can later lead to other health problems such as strokes and heart attacks. A risk factor for obesity is age because metabolism slows down as one gets older. Another risk factor is being a woman as they are more highly predisposed to weight gain. Lastly, a risk factor can sometimes be genes. The guest speaker encourages everyone to examine and change their lifestyle according to their age. Exercise and eating healthy are the two best ways to maintain a healthy weight. There is a nutrition and lifestyle program CDU has started at the Weingart YMCA called “Lifestyle Intervention and Food Education (LIFE) Center”. It takes place weekly from 10 am- 2 pm at the YMCA located at 9900 Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 90025. The Cecil Murray Center for Community Engagement is also hosting classes on the affordable care act from March 7th – May 2014. It will be held at the Murray center located at 509 W 29th St.




Smoking Cessation and Black HIV Positive Men who have Sex with Men: Charles McWells, Jimmie Creer

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 This weeks’ episode was about smoking cessation and black HIV positive men. HIV stands for human immune deficiency virus whereas AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Having HIV can lead to AIDS but it is not the same thing. A person having AIDS will have a CD 4 count below 200 along with 2 or more of the 20 predetermined diseases. Over a million people are living with HIV in the US. However, the prevalence of the disease is greater in the African American community. The total African American population in the US is 10%, and they make up 52% of those who are diagnosed with HIV. HIV positive smokers have a life expectancy of only 63 years, and HIV positive non-smokers have a life expectancy of 78 years. There are certain subgroups of HIV positive people that smoke more than the general population which are men, African Americans, and gay people. Charles McWells discusses his study that looks at smoking among black HIV positive men who have sex with other men. This population represents about 75% of the new infections. The three main questions looked at in this study are; why did they start smoking, why did they continue to smoke, and what kind of cessation program might be helpful for people like them. Most people said they started smoking because of peer pressure. Some people said they continued to smoke because of habit while others said they continued smoking because of HIV stigma, HIV fatality, stress about racism and homophobia. The greatest help anyone can get is through faith in God and seeking faith based support groups. The speakers leave the audience with a positive message of never giving up and never allowing past failure deter you from giving up on the goal of quitting smoking. This weeks’ announcements were for the CDU’s Farmers Market 1 year anniversary on February 21, 2014 from 10 am-2 pm. They also invite everyone to join in a community forum discussing same gender men and HIV, taking place on March 8th from 11 am-2 pm at the Children’s Hospital in Hollywood.




The Role of Churches in Community Outreach and Education About Alzheimer's and Other Dementias: Reverend Robert Bolden, Sal De Los Angeles

Wednesday, February 05, 2014 This week’s episode focused on dementia and Alzheimer’s. Someone experiencing dementia usually suffers through severe memory loss that interferes with daily life. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that attacks more than 5 million Americans. It causes problems in 3 primary areas; memory, general thinking, and behavioral changes. Dementia can cause Alzheimer’s but they are not the same thing. Over 70 % of people that have dementia end up with Alzheimer’s. African Americans and Latinos are twice as likely to suffer from some type of dementia later in life. It is important to make a stronger commitment not only with physical activities, but also brain activities, and healthy diets to help reduce the risk of dementia. Other ways to do this is to keep the brain stimulated by being engaged in the community, volunteer work, maintaining a social life, and reading. The guest speakers encourage the listening audience to seek help through various resources in the community such as the Alzheimer’s Association 24 hour hotline at 1-800- 272-3900. Also, they invite everyone to join them in a seminar about dementia, Alzheimer’s, and various other ailments given by Dr. Black. It will take place at 7901 S Vermont, Los Angeles on February 16th at 1 pm.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle, Mr. John Patton

Wednesday, January 29, 2014 Today’s guest speakers were Dr. David Carlisle, President of Charles R. Drew University, and Mr. John Patton, the University Chief Council. They provided the listening audience with university updates from 2013. They were proud to announce the generous 7 figure donation bestowed by Mr. and Mrs. Emma and Joe. The Mervyn Dymally School of Nursing has also been established with about 300 students. There are about 700 students that make the total enrollment of the university’s various schools and programs. CDU is also celebrating the accreditation of 2 programs. The first being the radiology technology program as well as the continuing medical education program. CDU was incorporated in 1966 and will soon be celebrating its 50th anniversary. CDU is also involved with various pipeline programs that encourage youth to pursue higher education. This year will be the 14th annual junior white coat and Saturday Science Academy ceremony, one of the university’s most successful pipeline programs. A number of students at CDU are products of such programs. There are many upcoming events planned for Black History month, as well as the Annual Spring Gala taking place on April 24th. There are also a series of events about the black male that will take place until June at the California African American Museum. Anyone is welcome to make contributions to the university by visiting www.cdrew.edu or calling 323-563-4987.




Depression Pt. 2: Treatment, CPIC and Supporting Caregivers: Dr. Kenneth Wells, Reverend Terence Stone

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 Depression is a period of sadness or loss of interest in things that you usually enjoy. It usually lasts every day for a couple of weeks. Although in some cases it can last for months to years. There are also physical symptoms to depression such as digestive issues, sleep disturbance, involuntary crying, being irritable, or being aggressive. There is no gold standard treatment for depression as every individual requires their own specific treatment that works best for them. There are a wide range of things that have shown to be successful. There are anti-depressant medications that are helpful for people with more severe depression, and milder medications with those who have less severe depression. In general, most side effects for most people are relatively minor. Besides medications, there are also talking therapies that have been proven to be just as effective as medication for some people. Many churches also have counseling services available or training sessions on how to deal with someone in the family diagnosed with depression. Unfortunately, many people try to handle depression on their own and resort to drugs and alcohol. Because of this, Community Partners in Care has been developed by community and academic partners who work together in learning how to best improve services for depression in LA communities.




Integrative Medicine: Holistic Approaches to Disease Prevention and Treatment: Dr. Randall Maxey, Gwen Moore

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 Integrative medicine is the combination of practices of traditional medicine as well as complementary and alternative medicine. This focuses more on wellness and prevention rather than curing. The top 10 leading causes of death in the US such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, etc… are diet related diseases that are preventable. We are what we repeatedly do. There are various Complementary approaches to promoting wellness and healthy lifestyle. Exercise and nutrition are the two most important preventative tools. It is like natural medicine for the body. Unfortunately, three fourths of Americans are overweight or obese which makes them more susceptible to chronic diseases. It is important to do physical activity at least 3 times a week for at least 30 minutes. The speakers remind the listeners that they are the CEO’s of their own body. If you don’t take care of your body no one else will.




(Rebroadcast) Practicing Kindness: Reverend James McKnight

Wednesday, January 08, 2014 To be kind is to treat others lovingly. Kindness is the oil that eases some of the friction of life. We should be kind and good to others because we interact with others on a daily basis and those interactions can be characterized by words. Sometimes there is hostility, envy, or discomfort because of differences; however, when we are kind it allows healing of some hurts. Research suggests that being kind can increase the level of happiness within the self and helps with brain functioning as well. Being kind betters our relationships with others and keeps family connections strong. The guest speaker leaves the audience with a great reminder of always trying to imitate the character of God. One of His greatest characteristics is kindness.




(Rebroadcast) Body, Mind, Spirit: The Role of Prayer & Meditation in Health Care: Krishna Kaur, Min. Donta Morrison

Wednesday, January 01, 2014 The Body, Mind and spirit is strongly connected to each other. If a person thinks or feels a certain way it can affect the body and organs, or how the body metabolizes food. The mind is our tool, we have to guide it. The body mind and spirit have to work in harmony to function. We have to see how we act and react to things around us. Every action begins with a thought. Beliefs control our decisions which ultimately control our actions. The spirit is like a muscle that needs to be exercised as well. When the spirit is strong it helps pull everything together.




(Rebroadcast) How to Maintain a Physical & Spiritual Balance: Dr. Rachelle Bross, Rev. Joyce Kitchen

Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Our spiritual connection with god is intangible. Our relationship with God has to be maintained through prayer, praise, worship, and fellowship. It is this relationship with God that is meant to inform our physical relationship with other people and our own life and the things we do and say. When spiritual balance is out of line than everything else in life becomes out of line. It is important to eat good foods and take care of the temple that is our body. When one is spiritually healthy it becomes easier to be physically healthy as well. The speakers remind the audience that is better to strive for progress rather than complete perfection. This week’s episode ended with a reminder to visit The Heritage at Vermont Village farmers market from 10 am to 2 pm. It is located at 7901 S. Vermont Ave Los Angeles.




Charity: Giving Any Gift: Reverend Ed Hansen

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 This week’s episode focused on charity and its importance. Charity is voluntary, not something we have to do. It is any gift of love we chose to provide where there are no expectations of anything in return. It is to give freely and lovingly. There are many benefits to the act of charity. It’s important to realize we live in a community and belong to one another. If we are going to improve life for all of us we have to do a part in helping this world be a better place. It is our duty to God to enhance the quality of life for everyone in the community; we are not isolated entities, but rather interwoven together. When someone is a giver, God brings more their way. The speakers remind the listening audience to not only give during the holidays. Instead, we should let the light of giving flicker throughout the year.




Practicing Kindness: Reverend James McKnight

Wednesday, December 11, 2013 To be kind is to treat others lovingly. Kindness is the oil that eases some of the friction of life. We should be kind and good to others because we interact with others on a daily basis and those interactions can be characterized by words. Sometimes there is hostility, envy, or discomfort because of differences; however, when we are kind it allows healing of some hurts. Research suggests that being kind can increase the level of happiness within the self and helps with brain functioning as well. Being kind betters our relationships with others and keeps family connections strong. The guest speaker leaves the audience with a great reminder of always trying to imitate the character of God. One of His greatest characteristics is kindness.




Cutting Slack Instead of Cutting Throat: Reverend Cecil Murray

Wednesday, December 04, 2013 This week’s episode focused on the importance of being kind to one another. Many people experience hurt between each other. Usually these feelings are exacerbated when we already feel hurt within ourselves. As a community everyone needs to learn how to cut some slack for others. Among young black males ages 18-31, the leading cause of death is homicide. The second leading cause of death for this age group is suicide. This alarming statistic displays that as a community we are hurting each other and ultimately hurting ourselves. There are many ways to combat this issue. Some suggestions are to put yourself in someone else’s shoes and learn about others as it decreases ignorance and increases compassion. The next time you have an urge to be upset at someone else, try to be kind. Observe how people react when you demonstrate an act of kindness. There is so much you get back from being kind.




Being Thankful and Expressing It: Reverened Joe Waller

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 This week’s guest, Reverend Joe Waller, describes his early struggles in life and how he was able to overcome them through being grateful. Instead of focusing on the weakness in our life we need to focus on the strength. We need to focus less on who we are and focus on God. Regardless of where one is in this walk of life, God is always walking besides us. We always have to realize that we can only do things with His strengths. Sometimes it is easy to overlook the simple blessings in our life such as waking up in the morning, being able to hear, see, or taste. It is very important to appreciate the big and small things in our life. Feeling grateful can improve one’s physical health, improve the outlook on life, and helps being satisfied regardless the situation. Religion and belief has also been shown to extend the lifespan of people. Reverend Waller closes by reminding everyone to be thankful and to spread gratefulness. Announcements: Invest in Charles R. Drew University by giving a tax deductible donation on Giving Tuesday, December 3rd , which is a National day of giving. Donations can be made at www.cdrew.edu. Remind everyone to be thankful and spread gratefulness.




Affordable Care Act: Covered California

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 The Affordable Care Act was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It allows Americans more access to affordable health coverage and also helps control the rising cost of health care. The Affordable Care act is also known as Public Law 111-48, ACA healthcare reform, and Obama care. There are a compilation of various health care plans available to you as a resident of California. The plans are organized by the type of coverage one wants. All the plans have 10 essential elements: preventive care , emergency care, hospital care, ambulatory services, laboratory services, prescriptions, mental health including substance abuse, pediatric services, maternity and newborn care, and rehabilitative care. There are various qualifying factors to be able to enroll. There are different ways to enroll such as online, through telephone hotline numbers, or various community agencies. Some of these agencies include NAACP, MS enterprise, Black Women for Wellness, California Black Health Network, and Shields for Families. Working with someone who is trained in the enrollment process can be of much benefit as they can easily walk you through all the steps. All private information that needs to be provided is secured and safe. More information can be found on the www.Coveredca.go. For assistance also call 1-800-300-1506 or 1-888-975-1142




(Rebroadcast) Eye Health: Dr. Richard Baker

Wednesday, November 13, 2013 According to a 2008 report of the National Eye Institute, among Americans aged 40 and older, more than 3.6 million are visually impaired. African Americans are 5 times more likely to be blind or visually impaired than most Americans. Visually impaired is defined as having a 20/40 vision or worse. Eye health is linked to overall health. Eye health is not relative to dying but it’s important to living. Vision is directly associated with likelihood of having a serious injury or fall, depression, and livelihood. It is important to consistently visit an optometrist to ensure proper eye health. Many conditions of the eyes can be prevented with proper care which can ultimately prevent blindness. For more information on eye health, the guest speaker encourages the audience to visit www.Geteyesmart.org.




Family Caregivers: Caring for our Elderly - Deyana Blacksher, Jewell Daniels

Wednesday, November 06, 2013 This week’s episode focused on Family Caregivers. Both guest speakers had experiences with family members suffering through various health issues and needing care. With the Baby Boomer population getting older, it is estimated that 70 million adults will join Medicare or need care by the year 2030. Someone who decides to be a care giver commits their life to serving a family member. Their tasks range from buying groceries, cleaning the house, helping them get dressed or out of bed, taking them to appointments, and helping them take their medication, to name a few. Care givers also serve as a companion, financial manager, and care coordinator. Many people feel guilty for feeling overwhelmed or overstretched. However, It is important to first take care of the self mentally, emotionally, physically, and spiritually. No one should feel ashamed for seeking help from other people or agencies. The Companion Care Plus agency provides family care giver services for 12.75 to 17 dollars an hour, and also accepts long term care insurance. Those who want more information are encouraged to call 310-676-2829




Fibromyalgia: Dr. Medell Briggs-Malonson, Loretta Jones

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and tenderness in localized areas. More than 12 million Americans suffer from Fibromyalgia with 1 in 30 women being affected and 1 in 200 men being affected. People with this condition often have symptoms of a crawling and painful burning sensation throughout the body, suffer from anxiety, depression, or fatigue. It is a disease of the nerves itself and usually affects both sides of the body as well as above and below the waist. Often times, it is difficult to describe the pain to doctors; however, it is important to take control and engage with doctors until they understand and are able to properly diagnose. The common drugs prescribed for this disorder are anti-depressants and anti-seizure medications to control the pain neurologically. The guest speakers remind the listening audience who suffer from Fibromyalgia to follow their medication regimen, practice relaxation techniques, and constantly pray to God to help change the state of mind. Lastly, the guest speakers remind the audience that there is help and relief to be found, and to never give up in being properly diagnosed.




Depression: Dr. Kenneth Wells, Pluscedia Williams

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 Depression is a clinical term used when someone feels persistent sadness and loss of interest. The guest speaker on this week’s episode describes her journey through depression and how she felt down, hopeless, and didn't feel there was anyone that could help her. Symptoms that many people experience are stress, confused about what they are feeling, stomach issues, shortness of breath, low self-esteem, irritability, headaches, and constant crying. Depression can be a discrete period of time between 2- 6 months or it can be chronic and smoldering lasting 2 years or more. Some people may experience one single episode in their lifetime while some people experience many episodes of depression. African American and Latino men are more likely to deal with depression without it ever being diagnosed. Most people don’t see a mental health specialist, and usually only see a general practitioner who in many times does not diagnose someone who may be experiencing serious depression. The guest speakers encourage the listening audience to visit a doctor and tell someone if they experience feelings of sadness. No one should be ashamed or hold back feelings. Depression is best treated in earlier stages, which also helps prevent reoccurring episodes.




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Today’s guest was Dr. Carlisle, the President of CDU, with an update on all the great things happening at the university. Recently they have started a community advisory council which is a mechanism for the university to be aware of the health and education issues in the community. It also allows for the community to be informed about various things going on at the university. There is also Community Faculty that seeks to capture innovation and creativity that is expressed everyday on the streets of LA. Dr. Carlisle discussed the various improvements that have taken place at the university such as becoming a financially stronger institution, increased student applications, increased student enrollment, and providing $300,000 in scholarships for students. Scholarships are possible through increased gifts from various people and groups in the community. There are also a number of faculty members that are doing great and ground breaking research at the university. Lastly, Dr. Carlisle mentioned the various community events the university participates in, and invites the listening audience to be a part of. October 26th will be the 4th annual Lets Move 5 k walk that will take place on the CDU campus. There is also the 2014 Spring Gala, a fundraising effort by CDU, which is open to the public. Everyone is welcome to make donations to the university online or by contacting Dr. Carlisle’s office at (323) 563-4987.




(Rebroadcast) Healthcare Reform and its Relevance: Norma Mtume

Wednesday, October 09, 2013 Healthcare Reform was designed to expand health care coverage and to reduce health disparities. Health care is one of the key challenges faced in Black and Latino communities. One of the highest expenses for the US government is medical care and service. There is a need to control health cost because it is increasing along with death and diseases. The Affordable Act was brought about to help control both increasing costs and increasing diseases. Some of the changes that the Affordable act mandates are greater access by expanding access to childless adults. It will also be mandatory for employers to offer insurance. Along with that, it will be expanding to cover things that are much more holistic such as wellness and preventative measures.




Alzheimer's Disease: Bryan Gaines, Rickey Sewell, Dr. David Trader

Wednesday, October 02, 2013 Dementia is an umbrella term for various diseases that cause memory loss which may affect other areas of functioning such as thinking, reasoning, judgment, and planning. Alzheimer’s is one type of dementia which is an irreversible disease. It’s a process of brain deterioration over time that affects brain functioning. The main risk factor for it is age. There are some genetic predispositions that make it more likely for this to occur in some people. Unfortunately the root cause of it is not exactly known. Typically it’s an older age disease after 65. Some of the symptoms for Alzheimer’s include memory loss, trouble remembering family members or friends, forgetting dates, problems speaking, writing, misplacing objects repeatedly, withdrawing socially, depression or anxiety. The guest speakers advise the listening audience to educate themselves on the disease especially if someone in the family has it. For more information on caretaking or support groups please visit www.Alzhiemers.com.




Cholesterol: Good Fat, Bad Fat - Dr. David Martins

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 Fat, carbohydrates, and proteins are all types of food energy. Calories are the units by which we measure food energy. However, fat is more dangerous in that it contains denser amounts of calories than carbohydrates and proteins. It is also stored in the body where as other types of food energy is expended. The intake and output of energy must balance in the human body. One’s level of activity should determine your calorie intake. When fat builds in your stomach it can be dangerous as it stores fat underneath the blood vessels. The over consumption of animal fat increases cholesterol. There are 2 sources of cholesterol in our body. One is produced from our liver and the other is from eating animal fats such as in processed foods and meats. It is important to stay away from certain foods to lower our cholesterol and replace it with healthier options. Some examples of healthier options are fish, turkey, or shrimp. For those who have no health problems, total cholesterol should be under 200. If one has hypertension or diabetes, but never had a stroke or heart attack, LDL should be less than 100. If one has already had a stroke/heart attack, LDL should be less than 70.




Children's Institute: Project Fatherhood - Alan Michael Graves, Anthony Young

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 Children’s Institute began over 100 years ago. It provides resources for children and families involved in trauma in the Los Angeles communities. They provide early childhood education, child trauma treatment, domestic violence services, family preservation, youth services, parent education, and trainings for professionals as well. Project Fatherhood is part of the Children’s Institute, and focuses on parent training. It was developed 25 years ago when it was realized that men were left out of the family equation. Project Fatherhood was designed to bring the father back into family by providing them with necessary resources. There has been a stigma that fathers don’t want to be part of their family’s lives. However, the issue is they did not have tools and resources to be a successful nucleus of their family. Project fatherhood runs 20 groups in LA including gay fathers, Latino fathers, African American fathers, substance abuse fathers, and many others. They have served over 1,100 fathers in 2013 so far. For more information you can call the Children’s Institute at 213-385-5100.




National Research Institute: Dr. Jose Mendoza, Susy Munoz, Dawn Santos

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 The National Research Institute provides access to innovative therapies and helps the community through clinical research. It is a disciplinary organization that tries to reach various populations affected by diseases. Clinical research is a branch of medicine that seeks to find safe and effective medicines and devices that can be used with humans. There are 5 phases of clinical research Phase 1 and 2 ensure it is safe to be used for healthy volunteers. Phase 3 incorporates people with the diseases. Phase 4 validates the dose that will be used for those patients, and Phase 5 is when it is commercialized. NRI focuses on metabolic diseases and also has a women’s initiative that focuses on diseases that affect women. NRI also has a unique recruitment approach as they collaborate with other organizations that can provide more resources to their patients. They attend many community events to do health assessments and disseminate practical health advice.




Present Your Body Research Project: Aziza Lucas-Wright, Reverend Cedric Alexander

Wednesday, September 04, 2013 This week’s episode focused on the Present Your Body study led by Aziza Lucas-Wright, Dr. Mohsen Bazargan, and Loretta Jones. Present your Body recruited 811 participants from 11 black churches of different denominations in South LA. It was a study to learn about people’s beliefs and knowledge about cancer. According to 2010 data from the American Cancer Society, African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival rate of any racial and ethnic groups with cancer. Of the men who have cancer, 34 % have cancer of the prostrate. That is twice the rate of lung cancer and 3 times the rate of colorectal cancer for black men. For women, 25 % have breast cancer while the rates for lung and colorectal cancer were 12 and 11 % respectively. The results of the study showed that most people knew someone who had cancer amongst their friends or family. Despite that a high number of people didn’t feel they were at any greater risk for cancer even though they knew people in their own family. This proved that there is a need for basic fundamental education as many parishioners didn’t even know what cancer was, how it starts, or the various types of cancers that exist. There is a need to educate parishioners on how to treat and support each other when cancer is present. For more information, the audience is encouraged to call Healthy African American Families at 323-292-2002.




Rebroadcast: Childhood Immunizations: Dr. Oliver Brooks

Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Dr. Oliver Brooks discusses the importance of immunizing/vaccinating children and the personal benefits as well as the benefits to society as a whole. Dr. Brooks explains many health issues that can result due to not being immunized/vaccinated. He shares that immunizations/vaccinations are felt to be one of the greatest public health advances of the 20th century. Dr. Brooks talks about what is being administered through immunizations/vaccinations and their role in helping to build the immune system of the human body. Resources: Immunize LA Families www.izlaf.org, Humbert M. Humphrey Clinic, Dial 211 for County Services, LA County of Public Health, www.immunizeca.org, Center for Disease Control www.cdc.gov 800-232-4636




Breastfeeding: Loretta Jones and Tera Hilliard

Wednesday, August 21, 2013 This week’s episode was on the importance of breast feeding. During slavery women breast fed their children and even others babies. Breast feeding was commonplace until the 1950's when the economy changed and welfare reform took place. This is also around the time the baby formula industry began to push for mothers and hospitals to use formula instead. They claimed it was healthier than breast milk. Presently, only 1 in 6 mothers breastfeed their babies up to 6 months. All mothers should be breastfeeding anywhere from 6 months to 2 and half years. Breast milk has many natural necessary nutrients baby’s need that can’t be found in formula. It has many benefits in brain development, providing good fatty acids, and developing a stronger immune system. There are many organizations such as Black Women for Wellness that promote breast feeding and offer various resources, support groups, and free breast feeding pumps.




Eye Health: Dr. Richard Baker

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 According to a 2008 report of the National Eye Institute, among Americans aged 40 and older, more than 3.6 million are visually impaired. African Americans are 5 times more likely to be blind or visually impaired than most Americans. Visually impaired is defined as having a 20/40 vision or worse. Eye health is linked to overall health. Eye health is not relative to dying but it’s important to living. Vision is directly associated with likelihood of having a serious injury or fall, depression, and livelihood. It is important to consistently visit an optometrist to ensure proper eye health. Many conditions of the eyes can be prevented with proper care which can ultimately prevent blindness. For more information on eye health, the guest speaker encourages the audience to visit www.Geteyesmart.org.




Eliminating Health Disparities: Government Burden or Personal Responsibility: STRIDE Students

Wednesday, August 07, 2013 This week’s episode was an educational debate between the Charles R. Drew University STRIDE students. The topic they debated was on health disparities and whether it is a government or personal responsibility. The students who supported government responsibility argued that the government should focus more on preventing the preventable diseases such as cardiovascular disease because it’s the leading cause of death in the United States resulting in over 600,000 deaths annually. The government controls the media and has mass resources to be able to bring information to the public to highlight diseases and promote prevention. The students who supported that health is a personal responsibility argued that the media is not responsible; rather the community needs to help each other. It is the duty of every individual to pass on whatever knowledge they gain to their families, church members, or peers. Both sides made great points. Perhaps it is collaboration between the government and community that is necessary to break health disparities.




Dealing with Addicts in the Family: Yolanda Simmons, Gail Vaughn-Harris

Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Addiction is the use of any mind altering chemical that controls livelihood and creates problems in lifestyle. Addiction is a process that develops with casual using and eventually turns into a craving which then becomes an addiction. You crave it more than anything else in life. Many times family members don’t want to admit that someone in their family has become addicted to something. It is important to identify the addiction and not ignore it. There is a basic 3 step process the guest speakers suggest once the co-dependent has done everything they can to no avail. Step 1: “I can’t do this on my own”. Step 2 is where you cry out to God and say “God can”. Step 3: we say “Let him”. When you know a loved one has an addiction it is important to not be in denial. As a family member you have to learn what the addict needs to bottom out so they can come to the end of themselves to start recovery. Many times we are doing things that are enabling them to prolong the problem. It is important to learn to be tough with God’s help.




Causes and Consequences of Senior Hunger and Obesity: Dr. Karen Lincoln, Bryan Gaines

Wednesday, July 24, 2013 In the U.S. hunger is a problem with seniors. Hunger is affecting millions especially in the LA County area where there are about 2 million residents who are food insufficient. Seniors are the most vulnerable to food insufficiency. There are many factors that lead to this issue. There is a lack of access to healthy foods and healthy supermarkets in certain neighborhoods. There are also many functional limitations that seniors have with, transportation, walking, vision problems, or amputated limbs due to diabetes. Obesity is another health issue that affects 30% of seniors. Obesity is determined by Body Mass Index which is a ratio of height and weight; BMI over 30 is defined as obese. Many seniors are affected because they don’t have easy access to healthy foods and have high levels of stress. It is important to identify resources in one’s neighborhood that can help deal with these issues. Senior centers or churches have lists of resources for people to utilize. The guest speakers encourage seniors to be more proactive in tackling these issues and for the community to help the elders around them.




Cell Reprogramming Research: Dr. Chris Reid

Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Stem cells are the cells of the body where the entire body originates. We all start life as a single fertilized egg cell. Stem cells are so powerful since they replace cells that are normally lost. The question arises if this could be a way to deal with a disease. Especially for those individuals who have damage anywhere in the body. The difference between an embryonic stem cell and an adult cell- is that the embryo has a job of producing overtime all the billions of cells that are in the human body by making other stem cells and producing specialized cells. Adult stem cells have the more limited job of producing replacement cells in certain tissue. Cell reprogramming allows the taking of a cell, for example a skin cell, and converting it to a cell that has properties which are akin to those of embryonic stem cells. With cell reprogramming we will be able to make replacement cells and organs




CDU Updates: Dr. David Carlisle

Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Charles R. Drew University was founded in 1966, and has remained opened since then. Its mission is to help communities that are underserved and under resourced by training health care professionals. This week’s episode provided the listeners with updates about the University from its president Dr. Carlisle. After 22 years of being at the University, Dr. Keith Norris departed the University. Currently the university has hired an Interim Provost which is the Chief Academic Officer who oversees the activities that define an education, teaching, research and patient care. The Interim provost is Dr. Mary Boyce from CSU Monterey Bay. The university has also recently embarked on a pathway to privately fundraise for money. If anyone is interested in donating to the university, you can go to the website (www.cdrewu.edu). On the homepage there is flashing tab that reads “giving to cdu” or you can call 323-563-4987. Dr. Carlisle also encourages CDU alumni to attend the alumni reception that will take place at the National Medical Association in Canada on July 29th. There will also be a 5k race at East LA College on August 11th at 8 am that will benefit the University. In addition there will be a Legacy harmony series, which is a jazz concert, held in Little Tokyo on September 7th 2013. This will recognize Mrs. Lillian Mobley, where money will go towards her foundation and scholarship fund.




How to Maintain a Physical and Spiritual Balance: Dr. Rachelle Bross, Reverend Joyce Kitchen

Wednesday, July 03, 2013 Our spiritual connection with god is intangible. Our relationship with God has to be maintained through prayer, praise, worship, and fellowship. It is this relationship with God that is meant to inform our physical relationship with other people and our own life and the things we do and say. When spiritual balance is out of line than everything else in life becomes out of line. It is important to eat good foods and take care of the temple that is our body. When one is spiritually healthy it becomes easier to be physically healthy as well. The speakers remind the audience that is better to strive f